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Wednesday, November 13
 

08:30

09:00

AM1. Publishing in the Journal of Second Language Writing
Publishing in academic journals can be intimidating to newcomers. The goal of this workshop is to help demystify the review and publication process, especially for scholars who are relatively new to publishing. The workshop, facilitated by a current and past editor of the Journal of Second Language Writing (JSLW), will draw on behind-the-scene insight into the JSLW to address questions such as: Is JSLW the right venue for my research? What pitfalls should I avoid in preparing my paper? How can I successfully turn dissertation research into an article? What are editors and reviewers looking for in submissions? How should I respond to reviews? The workshop will follow a two-part structure, beginning with a full-group workshop with some interactive activities, and ending with two smaller discussion groups, in which we address individual questions.

This is a ticketed event. Visit the Institute page for more information.

Speakers
avatar for Icy Lee

Icy Lee

Professor at the Faculty of Education, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Icy Lee is a Professor at the Faculty of Education of The Chinese University of Hong Kong, where she is currently serving as Chair of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Her research interests include second language writing, classroom assessment and feedback, and second... Read More →
avatar for Christine Tardy

Christine Tardy

Professor of English Applied Linguistics, University of Arizona
Christine Tardy is a Professor of English Applied Linguistics at the University of Arizona, where she teaches courses in TESOL, applied linguistics, and second language writing to undergraduate and graduate students. Her research interests include second language writing, genre theory... Read More →


Wednesday November 13, 2019 09:00 - 12:00
Alumni Lounge

09:00

AM2. Implementing and assessing collaborative writing activities
Collaborative writing is an activity which involves the co-authoring of a text by two or more authors who share responsibility for the creation of the entire text (Storch, 2013). A growing body of research (e.g. Kim, 2008; Shehade, 2011; Storch, 2002, 2005; Yeh, 2014) has shown that when second language (L2) learners engage in collaborative writing activities they are exposed to different ideas, they negotiate how to express their ideas, and they give and receive peer feedback on language use. In other words, these activities can provide L2 learners with opportunities for language learning as well as for learning to write in the L2. However, simply assigning students to produce a text jointly will not necessarily result in a successful learning activity. Successful collaborative writing activities need to be carefully designed and implemented.

In this hands-on workshop we focus on these design and implementation decisions. We consider first the different kinds of writing tasks that have been employed in research on collaborative writing in terms of their suitability for the specific teaching context and student population. We then deal with issues related to grouping of learners, including the advantages and drawbacks of same proficiency versus mixed proficiency groups, the size of the group, and whether the teacher should allocate students to writing groups or allow students to self-select. The final issue relates to how best assess collaborative writing, looking at some of the proposed grading schemes which attempt to assess not only the final product but also the learners’ contributions to the collaborative writing activity. I conclude the workshop by outlining areas that require further investigation.

This is a ticketed event. Visit the Institute page for more information.

Speakers
avatar for Neomy Storch

Neomy Storch

Associate Professor in Applied Linguistics and ESL, The University of Melbourne
Neomy Storch is an Associate Professor in Applied Linguistics and ESL at the School of Languages and Linguistics, the University of Melbourne. She teaches a range of ESL and Applied Linguistics subjects and convenes the ESL program. Her research has focused on issues related to second... Read More →


Wednesday November 13, 2019 09:00 - 12:00
Gold

09:00

AM3. Creating and assessing placement practices to maximize student agency in composition course placement
The regular presence of second language (L2) writers in college composition programs has led writing programs and writing program administers to continue to determine appropriate placement that can address the differing needs of this linguistically diverse population. This workshop, which is grounded in a theoretical framework of agency (Saenkhum, 2016), will discuss (1) practical strategies that enable writing programs to maximize student agency in the process of placement decisions and (2) an assessment framework that leads to a sustainable assessment of placement practices.

Through a critical review of placement frameworks, including placement methods and placement options (e.g., Matsuda & Silva, 1999; Silva 1994), we will consider how participants can create placement procedures that maximize student agency in the placement of students into writing courses in their local contexts. Specifically, led by the presenter, participants will design placement materials/documents (e.g., brochure, handout) that can be used at their institutions aiming to better communicate placement information to related stakeholders, including students, advisors, and writing teachers. In the second half of the workshop, the presenter will discuss a framework for assessing placement that is continual and includes perspectives from multiple stakeholders. The presenter will share with participants some assessment instruments that have been utilized to assess placement practices of an L2 writing program.

Participants will be asked to consider this assessment framework to be applied in their own institutional contexts. Ultimately, these hands-on activities will give participants concrete strategies for creating and assessing placement practices that better serve the needs of L2 writers. The workshop will leave time at the end for questions and discussion, and participants will also be encouraged to share their designed placement materials and/or assessment tools.

This is a ticketed event. Visit the Institute page for more information.

Speakers
avatar for Tanita Saenkhum

Tanita Saenkhum

Associate Professor of Rhetoric, Writing, and Linguistics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Tanita Saenkhum is an Associate Professor of Rhetoric, Writing, and Linguistics at University of Tennessee, Knoxville, where she directs the ESL program and teaches courses in L2 writing, TESOL methods, and SLA. Her book, Decisions, Agency, and Advising: Key Issues in the Placement... Read More →


Wednesday November 13, 2019 09:00 - 12:00
Copper

09:00

AM4. Creating opportunity for nonnative English speaking teachers of writing
Over the last few decades, TESOL professionals have increasingly called attention to the biases nonnative English speaking teachers (NNESTs) face from prospective employers, students, and colleagues based on their accent, their nationality, their race/ethnicity, and other characteristics. This movement has led to a number of collections, such as Braine’s (1999) widely cited Non-native Educators in English Language Teaching, as well as groups such as the NNEST Interest Section in TESOL. Much of this work has focused on language teachers more broadly by for instance emphasizing students’ have a teacher who sounds like a native speaker. The co-facilitators of this workshop have recently worked to draw attention to NNESTs of writing through an article (Ruecker, Frazier, & Tseptsura, 2018) and have launched a related edited collection.

Drawing on their research and teaching experiences, the facilitators will begin by reviewing the existing literature on NNESTs in TESOL and writing studies and the limited work we have to date specifically focused on writing teachers in both mainstream and L2 writing classrooms. Then they will invite participants to reflect on their own teaching experiences and share prejudice and challenges they’ve faced in their professional lives in small groups, drafting scenarios that they will give to other groups to plan a response to. After a break, participants will devote the remainder of time to developing and sharing materials that they can use to enhance the agency of NNESTs, such as a brochure for faculty and staff, a plan for a workshop for new NNESTs, and a curriculum that can help sensitize students to the variety of world Englishes . Focusing on the assets that NNESTs bring to their classrooms and institutions and the benefits of including broader international perspectives into professional conversations, participants will identify ways they can advocate for NNESTs’ rights and support greater linguistic and cultural diversity.

This is a ticketed event. Visit the Institute page for more information.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Ruecker

Todd Ruecker

Associate Professor of English and Director of Core Writing, University of Nevada, Reno
Todd Ruecker is Associate Professor of English and Director of Core Writing at the University of Nevada, Reno. His work explores the increasing diversity of educational institutions and advocates for institutional and policy changes to support multilingual student and teacher success... Read More →
avatar for Mariya Tseptsura

Mariya Tseptsura

Assistant Director of Composition, University of New Mexico
Mariya Tseptsura is Assistant Director of Composition at the University of Nevada Las Vegas where she coordinates UNLV’s online writing courses. Her research focuses on supporting multilingual students in writing courses across delivery modes and advocating for greater accessibility... Read More →


Wednesday November 13, 2019 09:00 - 12:00
Chrysocolla

09:00

AM5. Intercultural rhetoric: Research methods and pedagogical applications
This workshop reviews the theoretical framework of Intercultural Rhetoric (IR), its primary research methods, and applications in teaching writing. The workshop consists of three parts. In the first part, we will provide an overview of IR with a focus on its continued relevance for researchers and teachers of second language writing, from contrastive rhetoric to translingualism. Part two illustrates the methods of analysis associated with IR with a detailed description of a recent empirical study that explored the writing in English of international graduate students in the US employing multiple IR methods of analysis. Finally, we will present a pedagogical application, an ESP course for Chinese undergraduate students competing in the international Interdisciplinary Contest in Modeling, based on an IR analysis of winning essays. The audience will be invited to reflect on the research and pedagogical applications presented and possible application that audience members could develop in their contexts.

This is a ticketed event. Visit the Institute page for more information.

Speakers
avatar for Ulla Connor

Ulla Connor

Chancellor’s Professor of English, Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis
Ulla Connor is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Director of the International Center for Intercultural Communication at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. A native of Finland, she has taught ESL and EFL on five different continents. Her research has focused... Read More →
avatar for Estela Ene

Estela Ene

Associate Professor, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis
Estela Ene is an Associate Professor, Director of the EAP Program and Director of the TESOL MA Program at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. She conducts classroom-oriented and corpus-based research on L2 writing in ESL and EFL contexts. She has written about pedagogical... Read More →


Wednesday November 13, 2019 09:00 - 12:00
Plata

12:00

Lunch Break (On Your Own)
Wednesday November 13, 2019 12:00 - 14:00
Engrained, MU Food Court

14:00

PM1. Publishing in the Journal of Second Language Writing
Publishing in academic journals can be intimidating to newcomers. The goal of this workshop is to help demystify the review and publication process, especially for scholars who are relatively new to publishing. The workshop, facilitated by a current and past editor of the Journal of Second Language Writing (JSLW), will draw on behind-the-scene insight into the JSLW to address questions such as: Is JSLW the right venue for my research? What pitfalls should I avoid in preparing my paper? How can I successfully turn dissertation research into an article? What are editors and reviewers looking for in submissions? How should I respond to reviews? The workshop will follow a two-part structure, beginning with a full-group workshop with some interactive activities, and ending with two smaller discussion groups, in which we address individual questions.

This is a ticketed event. Visit the Institute page for more information.

Speakers
avatar for Icy Lee

Icy Lee

Professor at the Faculty of Education, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Icy Lee is a Professor at the Faculty of Education of The Chinese University of Hong Kong, where she is currently serving as Chair of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Her research interests include second language writing, classroom assessment and feedback, and second... Read More →
avatar for Christine Tardy

Christine Tardy

Professor of English Applied Linguistics, University of Arizona
Christine Tardy is a Professor of English Applied Linguistics at the University of Arizona, where she teaches courses in TESOL, applied linguistics, and second language writing to undergraduate and graduate students. Her research interests include second language writing, genre theory... Read More →


Wednesday November 13, 2019 14:00 - 17:00
Alumni Lounge

14:00

PM2. Designing assignments to enhance transfer of writing skills and strategies
One of the common goals for English for Specific or Academic Purposes classes should be to prepare students to write in a variety of ways appropriate for a variety of classes. That is, instructors should be teaching for transfer of learning. Though the notion of “teaching for transfer” has been misunderstood, misapplied and sometimes even controversial, scholars in writing studies in recent years have begun to identify and operationalize the tenets of writing transfer pedagogy in various useful and accessible ways.

This Institute workshop will provide both an introduction to the teaching for transfer research in the larger writing studies community and hands-on ways to apply it, especially in courses and programs focused on L2 writers. This workshop will provide demonstrations, practice, and discussion focusing on how this goal of teaching for transfer might be achieved. First, the concept of transfer of learning will be explained, and the types of questions and instructions most amenable to learning transfer will be presented. Then a variety of writing prompts and the analyses to deconstruct them will be presented and practiced. Following this, participants will be assisted in creating their own writing prompts, based upon the principles demonstrated. The workshop will conclude with questions and suggestions from the participants.

This is a ticketed event. Visit the Institute page for more information.

Speakers
avatar for Dana Ferris

Dana Ferris

Professor & Director, University of California, Davis
Dana R. Ferris, Professor and Director of the University Writing Program at the University of California, Davis, has had a wide-ranging career as a teacher, teacher-educator, researcher, writer, editor, and writing program administrator. Her books and articles have focused primarily... Read More →
avatar for Ann M. Johns

Ann M. Johns

Professor Emerita, San Diego State University


Wednesday November 13, 2019 14:00 - 17:00
Gold

14:00

PM3. Issues and strategies in L2 writing program administration: Policies, procedures, and politics
Second language writing specialists often find ourselves in administrative roles—often inadvertently and with or without official titles. The administrative work, in addition to the additional workload, often creates new and unexpected challenges because of the lack of recognition, institutional status, funding, staff support, or institutional status. Furthermore, few graduate programs offer coursework or professional development opportunities in the area of program administration specifically for second language writing specialists.

This session is an attempt to fill this gap by providing an opportunity to discuss various issues L2 writing specialists face in engaging in administrative work, and offering strategies to overcome those challenges. Some of the possible questions to be addressed include: How can I raise the awareness among my colleagues about the presence and needs of L2 writers? How can I work effectively with faculty members who have more institutional power and status than I? How can I motivate colleagues to participate in professional development workshops on L2 writing? How can I create visibility and legitimacy for my administrative work related to L2 writing? How can I manage my administrative workload and avoid being burned out?

The session will begin with a discussion of the particular issues faced by the participants. The presenter will then offer insights, strategies and resources in addressing those issues. This session is a highly interactive discussion based on the participants' specific needs, and the presenter will address them by drawing on his knowledge of writing program administration scholarship as well as his own experience as a writing program administrator and educational consultant.

This is a ticketed event. Visit the Institute page for more information.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Kei Matsuda

Paul Kei Matsuda

Professor of English, Arizona State University
Paul Kei Matsuda is Professor of English and Director of Second Language Writing at Arizona State University, where he works closely with doctoral students specializing in second language writing from various disciplinary perspectives. He is also Concurrent Professor of Applied Linguistics... Read More →


Wednesday November 13, 2019 14:00 - 17:00
Copper

14:00

PM4. Classroom writing assessment
In the quest for accountability in writing assessment, teachers might lose sight of those to whom we should first be accountable: our students. Providing students with clear, accessible, and understandable classroom writing assessment materials promotes accountability. In this 3-hour hands-on workshop, participants explore theoretical and practical issues related to the assessment of L2 writers and their writing by working to understand and create assessment instruments that are transparent and comprehensible to students while acting as both teaching and assessment tools. The workshop leader will first distribute and discuss examples of student writing and several different types of rubrics. Participants will practice rating various writing sample, discussing their decisions before dividing into small groups to create assignments for their own classrooms. They will work to generate criteria for the assignments, following up with rubric creation based on those criteria. Participants will then present their criteria and rubrics for critique and discussion.

This is a ticketed event. Visit the Institute page for more information.

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Crusan

Deborah Crusan

Professor of TESOL/Applied Linguistics, Wright State University
Deborah Crusan is Professor of TESOL/Applied Linguistics at Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio, where she teaches in the MATESOL program. Her work has appeared in numerous academic journals and edited collections focusing on second language writing. Her research interests include... Read More →


Wednesday November 13, 2019 14:00 - 17:00
Chrysocolla

14:00

PM5. SLW in K-12: Issues, strategies, and integration
Second language writing research at the elementary and secondary levels (K-12) has continued to take prominence over the past several years. The goal of this workshop is to provide an overview of issues and strategies that have been implemented in K-12 classrooms using a variety of methodologies and approaches, drawing on de Oliveira & Silva (2013, 2015). Workshop participants explore theoretical and practical issues related to the teaching of L2 writers in K-12 contexts, especially considering the implementation of genre-based approaches and the integration of L2 writing with other literacy skills.

This is a ticketed event. Visit the Institute page for more information.

Speakers
avatar for Luciana C. de Oliveira

Luciana C. de Oliveira

Chair and Professor, University of Miami
Luciana C. de Oliveira, Ph.D., is Chair and Professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning in the School of Education and Human Development at the University of Miami, Florida. Her research focuses on issues related to teaching English language learners (ELLs) at the K-12 level... Read More →


Wednesday November 13, 2019 14:00 - 17:00
Plata

18:00

Pre-Symposium Social
Wednesday November 13, 2019 18:00 - 21:00
TBA
 
Thursday, November 14
 

08:30

Morning Refreshments
Thursday November 14, 2019 08:30 - 09:15
Alumni Lounge

08:30

Registration
Thursday November 14, 2019 08:30 - 17:00
Alumni Lounge

09:00

Exhibits
Thursday November 14, 2019 09:00 - 17:00
Alumni Lounge

09:15

Opening Ceremony
Thursday November 14, 2019 09:15 - 09:45
Arizona

09:45

Opening Plenary: Learner agency enactment in L2 writing activities
The concept of human agency has recently generated considerable interest in the field of L2 learning, mirroring the interest evident in other disciplines (see Deters et al., 2014). In the field of L2 learning, agency is generally understood as implying a human’s capacity to make deliberate and conscious choices in pursuit of individual goals (Duff, 2012). However, how agency is defined and investigated depends to a large extent on the researcher’s theoretical perspectives. The theoretical perspectives that have informed most of my research are sociocultural theories. It is these theories, and in particular activity theory, that inform my reflections and exploration of agency in the writing activities that I have investigated over many years: collaborative writing, peer feedback and response to teacher feedback.

In this presentation, drawing on data from studies that I and colleagues have conducted, I show that in these writing and feedback activities, agency is manifested in actions such as the stances or roles learners adopt when working with peers and in how they engage with and respond to feedback provided by a peer or teacher. Agency is also evident in the learners’ reflections when describing their actions in retrospective interview. This data seems to support a sociocultural view of agency, where agency is perceived not only as an individual phenomenon, but also as relational and situated (Lantolf & Pavlenko, 2001). It emerges in human interactions and is influenced by the inherent power structures and norms of behaviour in the context within which an activity takes place. I deploy activity theory as a heuristic to make visible the relationship between these individual and context-related factors and thus the complex and dynamic nature of agency.

Agency is increasingly recognised as a central aspect of language learning. It not only shapes learner (and teacher) behaviour in classroom activities but also the learning opportunities afforded by these activities (e.g., Storch, 2002; Storch & Aldossary, forthcoming). I conclude with suggestions on how we can promote and accommodate learners’ agency in L2 writing and feedback activities as well as the kind of research that can further enhance our understanding of learner agency.

Speakers
avatar for Neomy Storch

Neomy Storch

Associate Professor in Applied Linguistics and ESL, The University of Melbourne
Neomy Storch is an Associate Professor in Applied Linguistics and ESL at the School of Languages and Linguistics, the University of Melbourne. She teaches a range of ESL and Applied Linguistics subjects and convenes the ESL program. Her research has focused on issues related to second... Read More →


Thursday November 14, 2019 09:45 - 10:45
Arizona

10:45

Break
Thursday November 14, 2019 10:45 - 11:00
Alumni Lounge

11:00

Open
Thursday November 14, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Plata

11:00

CANCELLED: Guiding students through metacognitive experiences that facilitate reflective revising of L2 writing
Metacognition involves reflective processes that inform how to accomplish a particular goal. However, L2 writers do not necessarily know or understand how to perform reflective thinking in a way that develops their writing. This presentation will show how instructors can facilitate metacognitive experiences at the revision stage of L2 writing.

Speakers
NT

Nancy Tarawhiti

Brigham Young University - Hawaii


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Copper

11:00

Can L2 writing activity help learners prepare for L2 speaking? An exploratory cross-modality study with a focus on computer-mediated communication
This exploratory study qualitatively investigates the impact of pair text-based computer-mediated communication (CMC) on subsequent individual L2 Chinese speaking performance through a transfer analysis. The results show that L2 writing activity via CMC tool could be a good preparation for L2 speaking performance.

Speakers
XZ

Xiaomeng Zhang

Arizona State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Graham

11:00

East meets West: Writing assessment, pedagogy, and administration in Chinese-American joint degree programs
This presentation draws on data from interviews with administrators and faculty at multiple institutions to examine practices around writing assessment, placement, aligning writing curricula, and hiring writing faculty within Chinese-American joint degree programs, offering specific suggestions for smoothing students' transitions between countries and avoiding cultural and administrative pitfalls.

Speakers
BS

Brooke Schreiber

Assistant Professor, Baruch College, CUNY
BB

Brody Bluemel

Delaware State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Gila

11:00

Faculty perspectives on the academic writing skills of graduate students & supports for writing
Our paper reports on how faculty members across several faculties of education located in Canada as well as Australia and Sri Lanka, refer and/or provide writing support for plurilingual graduate students during their coursework, comps and the thesis writing process through a survey, interviews and focus groups.

Speakers
AG

Antoinette Gagné

OISE, University of Toronto
VB

Victorina Baxan

University of Toronto
NR

Newton Ranaweera

PhD Student, University of Toronto


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Santa Cruz

11:00

Multiple perspectives on group assignments
Our project, conducted with EAL students undertaking a Masters in Applied Linguistics, investigated students' and teachers' perspectives and experiences of group assignments. Data included students' contributions to Google Docs group assignments as well as interviews with teachers and students. Our findings reveal the benefits and challenges of such assignments.

Speakers
avatar for Neomy Storch

Neomy Storch

Associate Professor in Applied Linguistics and ESL, The University of Melbourne
Neomy Storch is an Associate Professor in Applied Linguistics and ESL at the School of Languages and Linguistics, the University of Melbourne. She teaches a range of ESL and Applied Linguistics subjects and convenes the ESL program. Her research has focused on issues related to second... Read More →
JM

Janne Morton

Lecturer, Univesrity of Melbourne


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Gold

11:00

On drawing on various disciplines in SLW research
This paper investigates the frequency of, and advocates for, integration of other disciplines into Second Language Writing (SLW) research. Besides Composition and Second Language Education, relevant fields include Linguistics, Sociology, History, Politics, Theater, and Anthropology. My survey of selected SLW journal articles and books delineates the status of such inclusion.

Speakers
SV

Stephanie Vandrick

Professor, University of San Francisco


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Yavapai

11:00

Stance Construction in Noun+that clauses: A corpus-based comparative study across disciplines, global and local academic writings
The study explores how post-modification of stance nouns in the [NOUN that] clauses is used across disciplines. It also compares local academic publications with globally published ones. Special attention is paid to the frequencies, forms and functions of post-modification structure based on two corpora: the BNC (British National Corpus) and the corpus of Taiwanese local journal articles (TLJ). Both corpora comprise two distinct sections: social sciences and natural sciences. Two research questions are explored:
1. What are the stance options of head nouns do academic writers prefer to use in social and natural sciences?
2. How do academic writers of social and natural sciences use the post-modification of stance nouns to convey authorial voice and construct knowledge?

Speakers
YL

Yichun Liu

Professor, National Chengchi University
TH

Ting Huang

National Chengchi University


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Yuma

11:00

Transitional genres in professional writing
This talk focuses on reflection-in-presentation, a model for formative assessment and designing responsive pedagogy in the professional writing classroom. Embedded reflective memos engaged the instructor and students in a transaction, whose outcome was the digital data bank - a transitional research and composing genre between the bibliography and white paper.

Speakers
avatar for Hadi Banat

Hadi Banat

Graduate Teaching Instructor, Purdue University
Hadi Banat is a rising fifth-year Ph.D. dissertation fellow in the English Department, Second Language Studies/TESL program at Purdue University. He teaches First Year Writing and Professional Communication. His research interests are in writing assessment, cross-cultural composition... Read More →


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Pinal

11:00

Translanguaging as a L2 writing strategy: A mixed-methods approach to optimizing multilingual writing strategies in L2 source-based academic writing
This presentation offers process-, product-, and survey-based documentation of EFL undergraduates' L2 writing skills development in a discipline-specific Linguistics course taught with a writing-intensive multilingual approach bridging two distinct types of translanguaging strategies. Findings from the multilingual course are contrasted with findings from an EFL control course.

Speakers
IA

Ina Alexandra Machura

Justus Liebig University Giessen


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Chrysocolla

11:00

Comparing second language writing process and products in computer- and paper-delivered tests
This study compares the L2 writing process and products in computer- and paper- delivered writing tests. The findings indicate differences in the L2 writing under different test modalities. Computer tests yielded more planning and revisions during writing while paper test forced deliberate pre-planning. Detailed results and implications will be discussed.

Speakers
MZ

Mingxia Zhi

Ph.D Candidate, The University of Texas at San Antonio


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Arizona

11:00

ESL student's comments on teacher's written corrective feedback in freshman composition classes
This study explores ESL students' comments on teacher's written corrective feedback in freshman composition classes to find out whether they think positively about the feedback and how they perceive the power relationship with the teacher.

Speakers
DT

Dung Tran

Research Assistant, University of Texas at San Antonio
My primary research interest is oral assessment. I'd like to investigate the validity of spoken English tests designed for ESL students and other issues related to spoken English. I'm also interested in ESL writing, especially the power relationship between students and teachers in... Read More →


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Arizona

11:00

First Years Writing about Translation
Translation as the topic for a first year seminar can level the playing field for multilingual writers. Works in translation foster close reading and critical analysis. Essays and memoirs by translators provide models of good writing and an opportunity to exploit the benefits of a linguistically diverse college classroom.

Speakers
BL

Betty Litsinger

Director, Multilingual Writing, Bryn Mawr College


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Arizona

11:00

From bilingualism to biliteracy: Incorporating first language writing into second language writing by ESL Latinx students
Based on the theory that second language literacy depends on first language literacy, application of Spanish in writing classes will help schools and colleges improve Latinx students' performance by reducing the opposition between two languages and making writing more meaningful.

Speakers
ST

Sofya Tarabrina

Graduate Teaching Assistant, University of New Mexico


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Arizona

11:00

The Effectiveness of Corpus-aided Instruction for a Success of Academic Writing in Higher Education
This study offers a pedagogical value of corpus-aided instruction for the success of international second language students in higher education. The study contributes to developing curriculum and instruction by exploring the effective instruction with the use of students-made linguistic features.

Speakers
EP

Eunjeong Park

The Ohio State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Arizona

11:30

Literature review writing in an L2: What graduate students need and want
Graduate L2 writers struggle with the complex demands of literature review writing due to its often implicit conventions. We developed a 15-week literature review course and measured the development of 15 graduate writers. Their experiences revealed many ways administrators, teachers, and advisors can support L2 students' literature review writing processes.

Speakers
avatar for Grant Eckstein

Grant Eckstein

Brigham Young University
Research lines include response to writing, corrective feedback in L2 writing, and writing center research (especially L2 learners in writing centers). In addition, I use eye-tracking methods to research the acquisition and development of L2 reading.


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:30 - 12:00
Gold

11:30

Rhetoric's outliers in L2 writing
I report on corpus-based analysis (Biber, 2015) of word clusters including "rhetoric" across 45 years of L2 writing literature apart from the widespread instances of "contrastive" and "intercultural" rhetoric. I am interested in focusing on these less widely circulating emergences of "rhetoric" as a way of exploring definitional nuances of a crucial, but narrowly construed, term in the field.

Speakers
JJ

Jay Jordan

University of Utah


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:30 - 12:00
Copper

11:30

Agentic engagement in an assessment as learning oriented writing classroom context
This study will explore how three Chinese undergraduate students engage agentically with AaL-oriented activities such as criteria understanding, multiple drafting, peer-/self-assessment, and personal goal-setting/monitoring/adjusting. Multiple data including writing tests, interviews, observations, stimulated recalls, and texts could reveal how AaL influences writing performance while students are agentically engaged in writing classrooms.

Speakers
LW

Lu Wang

PhD Student, The Chinese University of Hong Kong


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:30 - 12:00
Arizona

11:30

Elementary L2 writers' different perceptions toward written corrective feedback from peers and the teacher
This qualitative case study demonstrated the full pedagogical and practical implications for L2 students and teachers in K-6 settings. Findings enabled L2 writing teachers to raise awareness of how elementary L2 learners perceive written corrective feedback from teacher and peer feedback.

Speakers
SH

Saem Heo

University of Minnesota


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:30 - 12:00
Arizona

11:30

L2 writing differences between two contexts: A corpus-based case study
This three-fold study assessed a learner's L2 learning environments, her L2 writing texts through corpus analysis, and an interview to gauge the differences between American and Chinese L2 writing instruction, experienced by the learner. Findings show significant contextual, lexical, syntactic, and psychological differences, concluding with pedagogical implications for both contexts.

Speakers
ST

Suneeta Thomas

Assistant Professor - TESOL/Linguistics, Missouri State University
YZ

Yukun Zhang

Missouri State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:30 - 12:00
Arizona

11:30

Putting Knowledge Into Practice: Learning About Our Bilingual Students
In my paper, I take an analytical approach to the discourse that surrounds bilingual writers. By discussing the literature that is done on bilingual students and agency in the classroom, I discusses activities aimed towards diversity that can be implemented in the composition classroom. My paper further includes a reflection of student feedback about the effectiveness of the activities.

Speakers
AG

Anjanette Griego

Arizona State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:30 - 12:00
Arizona

11:30

"First they learn to write in Awajún and then in Spanish": A study about the factors that condition the success of the acquisition of writing in the first and second language in bilingual communities of the Peruvian Amazon
The present research aims to validate the hypothesis of transfer of literacy considered in the Peruvian National Curriculum, by observing, during the first three years of schooling, the actual performance of the writing skills of bilingual indigenous students whose first language is Awaj√∫n and the second is Spanish.

Speakers
RG

Roberto Garcia-Zevallos

Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú
NV

Nila Vigil-Oliveros

Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:30 - 12:30
Yavapai

11:30

L1 effects on L2 written production in mind-body-world alignment
We report on a case study exemplifying how L1 is used for meaning-making and how L1 exerts effects on L2 written production in mind-body-world alignment. The findings indicate that L1 as one of the main semiotic resources in meaning-making should be applied strategically to facilitate practitioners and learners to teach and learn L2 writing.

Speakers
YS

Yachao Sun

Purdue University
avatar for Ge Lan

Ge Lan

phd candidate, Purdue University
I am a phd candidate in second language studies at Purdue, and my research interests include corpus linguistics, L2/EAP writing, and natural language processing. I have been working on corpus-based analysis on grammatical complexity (primarily noun phrase complexity) in L2/EAP writing... Read More →


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:30 - 12:30
Chrysocolla

11:30

L1 writing experiences and L2 writing perceptions: Is there a relationship?
This study reports on the findings of a qualitative inquiry. 15 Iranian EFL learners' L1 writing experiences were explored to see whether they had an impact on the learners' L2 writing perceptions. The findings showed that prior writing experiences are important determiners of L2 writing perceptions.

Speakers
HS

Hooman Saeli

University of Tennessee
AC

An Cheng

Oklahoma State University, Stillwater


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:30 - 12:30
Graham

11:30

L2 writing curriculum design and review through faculty collaboration
This presentation highlights lessons learned from a longitudinal study of an alternative approach to more traditional models of L2 writing curriculum development and review. This faculty-driven systematic educational efficacy review led to new sequential course designs, standardized curriculum across sections, and incorporation of student feedback in an ongoing collaborative environment.

Speakers
SB

Sydney Bassett

Auburn Global at Auburn University
Sydney currently works as an English Program Specialist at Auburn Global. Her interests include curriculum development, faculty collaboration, and socio-cultural adjustment of international students.
IP

Irene Pannatier

Auburn Global at Auburn University
DW

DeElla Wiley

Auburn Global Auburn University


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:30 - 12:30
Santa Cruz

11:30

Labor and agency in second language writing program administration
In this paper, we compare the experiences of second language writing specialists embedded in three small liberal arts colleges' writing programs. By analyzing how titles, job descriptions, and mission statements ignore and/or acknowledge their labor, we articulate gaps between the work members of their institutions and communities think they do versus the work they actually do.

Speakers
GM

Greer Murphy

Director of Academic Honesty, Claremont Graduate University
TM

Troy Mikanovich

Student/Writing Consultant, Claremont Graduate University


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:30 - 12:30
Gila

11:30

Stancetaking in narrative: International graduate teaching associates’ identity negotiation as writing instructors across the curriculum
International graduate teaching associates (IGTAs) juggle complex positions as they construct their teacher identities within liminal spaces. Within their stories, we analyze the stances the IGTAs take in relation to their students and the roles their transnational experience play in situating themselves in teaching second-year writing courses.

Speakers
TR

Tamara Roose

The Ohio State University
MC

Min-Seok Choi

Graduate Teaching Associate, The Ohio State University
CM

Christopher Manion

The Ohio State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:30 - 12:30
Yuma

11:30

The resemiotization process of a graduate student in a research writing course: A systemic functional linguistics approach
The session describes the paper titled "The Resemiotization Process of a Graduate Student in a Research Writing Course: A Systemic Functional Linguistics Approach". The study deals with the resemsiotization process of an L2 graduate student when he turns his written research abstract to a video abstract.

Speakers
SN

Sara Nezami Nav

Graduate Teaching/Research Assistant, Oklahoma State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 11:30 - 12:30
Pinal

12:00

Lunch Break (On Your Own)
Thursday November 14, 2019 12:00 - 13:30
Engrained, MU Food Court

12:15

JSLW Editorial Board Meeting
Thursday November 14, 2019 12:15 - 13:15
Gold

13:30

A blended collaborative writing approach in multilingual First-Year Composition: Who is contributing and how?
This study explores L2 students' interaction during blended collaborative writing in a multilingual college composition class. Preliminary findings suggest that the blended collaborative writing approach allowed for new forms of interaction and has the potential for altering the definition of who are considered "passive" participants in traditional face-to-face group work.

Speakers
JR

Jui-Hsin Renee Hung

Indiana University Bloomington


Thursday November 14, 2019 13:30 - 14:00
Yavapai

13:30

A Korean bilingual child's multimodal journal writing as a transnational space
We examine a second-grade Korean-English bilingual child's journal writing as his transnational space. Focusing on the intersections between two languages and between languages and images, we found he brought his transnational experience and knowledge into journal entries about his local experiences and social relationships by using diverse semiotic resources.

Speakers
MC

Min-Seok Choi

Graduate Teaching Associate, The Ohio State University
LM

Leslie Moore

The Ohio State University
HN

Ha na Cho

Independent researcher


Thursday November 14, 2019 13:30 - 14:00
Yuma

13:30

Developing a learner corpus for materials creation and evaluation in an advanced ESL writing course
A learner corpus of ESL essays was analyzed for frequency and errors of transition words in four genres in order to create classroom materials targeting underused and misused transitions. After using these materials, students more frequently produced the targeted transitions but with some errors, raising issues for further materials development.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Hilliard

Amanda Hilliard

ESL Instructor, Arizona State University
Amanda Hilliard is an ESL instructor at ASU and a PhD student in Linguistics at the University of Birmingham, England.


Thursday November 14, 2019 13:30 - 14:00
Copper

13:30

Front-line work with student writers: Stress and trauma in the writing center
University students often bring more than just their papers to the writing center: life events, mental illnesses, disabilities, linguistic discrimination, and other non-writing-related issues can strongly impact the students' ability to write and their behaviour during tutorials, and in turn, have a potentially traumatic effect on the tutors' mental health.

Speakers
avatar for Lucie Moussu

Lucie Moussu

Director, Centre for Writers, University of Alberta


Thursday November 14, 2019 13:30 - 14:00
Chrysocolla

13:30

I "talked the talk," but did I "walk the walk"? A self-study of language ideologies embedded in high school writing lessons
A former high school English teacher turned novice teacher educator discusses how a self-study of implicit language ideologies embedded in her high school writing lessons allowed her to examine whether she had actually created the linguistically inclusive writing spaces for L2 writers that she thought she had.

Speakers
NR

Nicole Ryan

Ph.D Student, University of Maryland, College Park


Thursday November 14, 2019 13:30 - 14:00
Gila

13:30

Undergraduate vocabulary size and academic performance
Although lexis is an important dimension of writing proficiency, it has seldom been investigated at the tertiary level, particularly in relation to the varied English literacy experiences of students. This paper presents preliminary results of a longitudinal study of vocabulary size of undergraduates in composition courses at a US university

Speakers
DE

Doreen Ewert

Professor, Rhetoric & Language, University of San Francisco
SS

Sunyoung Shin

Indiana University


Thursday November 14, 2019 13:30 - 14:00
Graham

13:30

Developing academic literacy and genre awareness: Getting started with SFL
L2 writers need to develop a wide range of academic literacy skills in order to succeed in undergraduate degrees. This colloquium introduces aspects of Systemic Functional Linguistics' genre theory that enable students and teachers to better understand and describe how language works to do the work of academic writing.

Speakers
SZ

Sandra Zappa

University of British Columbia
Sandra Zappa-Hollman, PhD, is an Assistant Professor and the Director of the AEP Vantage College at the University of British Columbia. Her research focuses on the academic literacy trajectories of international EAL students.
avatar for Nigel Caplan

Nigel Caplan

Associate Professor, University of Delaware
Nigel Caplan is an Associate Professor at the University of Delaware English Language Institute, where he teaches ESL to international undergraduate and graduate students. His textbooks include Grammar Choices for Graduate and Professional Writers (Michigan), and two levels in the... Read More →
SP

Silvia Pessoa

Carnegie Mellon University
TM

Thomas Mitchell

Associate Teaching Professor of English, Carnegie Mellon University
PG

Pia Gomez

Carnegie Mellon University
RM

Ryan Miller

Kent State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 13:30 - 15:00
Gold

13:30

Languaging during L2 writing: What influences the nature and outcomes of languaging? 16 1530-17
The colloquium brings together a set of empirical studies investigating different forms and modes of laguaging in writing and revision-related activities. The papers present findings showing evidence of the language learning benefits of languaging and identifying factors that can impact the quantity and quality of languaging in L2 writing activities.

Speakers
avatar for Mimi Li

Mimi Li

Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University-Commerce
Dr. Mimi Li is an Assistant Professor of Applied Linguistics/TESOL in the Department of Literature and Languages at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Her research areas focus on L2 writing and CALL. Her work has appeared in Journal of Second Language Writing, Computer Assisted Language... Read More →
avatar for Neomy Storch

Neomy Storch

Associate Professor in Applied Linguistics and ESL, The University of Melbourne
Neomy Storch is an Associate Professor in Applied Linguistics and ESL at the School of Languages and Linguistics, the University of Melbourne. She teaches a range of ESL and Applied Linguistics subjects and convenes the ESL program. Her research has focused on issues related to second... Read More →
WS

Wataru Suzuki

Associate Professor, Miyagi University of Education
AF

Ana Fernández Dobao

Associate Professor, University of Washington
LY

Luxin Yang

Beijing Foreign Studies University
avatar for Masatoshi Sato

Masatoshi Sato

Professor, Universidad Andrés Bello
MI

Masako Ishikawa

Josai University


Thursday November 14, 2019 13:30 - 15:00
Arizona

13:30

Aiming for authenticity of text and task in EAP writing instruction: Altering course design and content to maximize learning
Inspired by the presenter's experience teaching and reconstructing a graduate-level EAP course, this interactive workshop will invite participants to consider (and perhaps re-examine) the concept of authenticity in designing EAP courses and assignments. Sample needs assessment tools, instructional materials, and academic literacy tasks will be supplied.

Speakers
avatar for John Hedgcock

John Hedgcock

Professor of Applied Linguistics, Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey
John Hedgcock, PhD, is Professor of Applied Linguistics at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, where he teaches in the MATESOL/MATFL Program. Co-author (with Dana Ferris) of Teaching L2 Composition (2014, Routledge) and Teaching Readers of English (2009... Read More →


Thursday November 14, 2019 13:30 - 15:00
Santa Cruz

13:30

Digital writing: ESL writers and creating a public piece
As students increasingly access information though their smartphones, have you considered having them compose something that would appeal to an online audience? This session provides a variety of tools to engage ESL students in a public piece assignment and shows how they can benefit from the non-traditional formats of digital writing.

Speakers
YA

Yu-Ching Annie Ou

Lasell College


Thursday November 14, 2019 13:30 - 15:00
Pinal

14:00

Assessing and providing feedback on lexical aspects of L2 writing: A qualitative study of instructors' practices and perceptions
This presentation reports the results of a qualitative study examining how instructors in post-secondary contexts assess vocabulary use in multilingual writers' developing compositions and how they provide written feedback to students. Emerging themes concerning assessment practices and perceptions about feedback will be discussed, along with implications for L2 writing pedagogy.

Speakers
BW

Brock Wojtalewicz

Instructor, Bow Valley College
MG

Melanie Gonzalez

Associate Professor, Salem State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 14:00 - 14:30
Graham

14:00

Creating multimodal texts in the L2 writing classroom: A re-mediation activity
This presentation discusses how students at an ESL composition class in the U.S. employed a re-mediation assignment to complement and facilitate the understanding of rhetoric. Apart from increasing motivation and engagement, the use of other abilities (e.g., video editing, storytelling), languages, and cultures helped with the writing process.

Speakers
avatar for Martha Sidury Christiansen

Martha Sidury Christiansen

University of Texas at San Antonio
Applied Linguistics, Linguistic Anthropology, sociolinguistics, digital literacy


Thursday November 14, 2019 14:00 - 14:30
Yuma

14:00

LancsBox: A user-friendly corpus tool for analyzing personal corpora
This presentation will introduce how LancsBox, a corpus software, can be used in writing classrooms to analyze personal corpora and provide students with authentic examples of language forms. A demonstration of how this software was successfully implemented in a graduate-level second language writing course will be provided.

Speakers
RC

Rebekah Callari-Kaczmarczyk

EIS Instructor, Duke University


Thursday November 14, 2019 14:00 - 14:30
Copper

14:00

Making OWLs more inclusive: Principles for ethical content design and development
Today, most students consume content via mobile devices. This means that the design of web-based content must change as well. The fields of L2 writing and writing centers have largely forgotten OWLs, leaving OWL designers without research-based theoretical or practical frameworks. This presentation will begin to address this gap.

Speakers
avatar for Joshua M. Paiz

Joshua M. Paiz

Teaching Assistant Professor, The George Washington University
Dr. Joshua M. Paiz is a teaching assistant professor in the English for Academic Purposes Program at GW. He holds a doctorate in Teaching English as a Second Language, as well as certificates in the teaching of writing, program leadership, advanced teaching practice, and educational... Read More →
GG

Ghada Gherwash

Colby College


Thursday November 14, 2019 14:00 - 14:30
Chrysocolla

14:00

Reinventing peer review for second language writers
Peer review is widely seen as a problematic part of the writing process for L2 writers (e.g., Carson & Nelson, 1996; Storch, 2013; Zhang, 1995). This presentation further complicates peer review and suggests alternatives to bring it from the ephemeral to the empirical world for L2 writers.

Speakers
SS

Sarah Snyder

Professor and WPA, Arizona Western College


Thursday November 14, 2019 14:00 - 14:30
Yavapai

14:00

Writing in an American high school: The role of task representation
This longitudinal study investigates Chinese international students' academic literacy experiences in an American high school, principally how these L2 writers understand and complete multiple writing tasks from their English Language Arts and U.S. history classes. Findings revealed these students' challenges in developing appropriate task representation and their relevant coping strategies.

Speakers
YZ

Yanan Zhao

The Ohio State Univeristy


Thursday November 14, 2019 14:00 - 14:30
Gila

14:30

CANCELLED: Analysis of shell nouns in study abroad returnees' L2 writings
This study investigates shell nouns, also known as lexical cohesive device, in the L2 writings of study abroad returnees. These returnees exhibit interesting differences in the use of shell nouns depending on their study abroad onset age. The results further attempt to analyze the attitude towards L2 writings.

Speakers
YJ

Yoo Jeong Jeong

Research Assistance, Korea University


Thursday November 14, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
Graham

14:30

CANCELLED: Peer review project in an EAP writing course
This presentation reports on a study in a first-year university EAP writing course of three peer-review formats. It has two aims: (i) to determine the most effective format for collecting and communicating feedback; and (ii) to assess students' understanding of and ability to do peer review.

Speakers
LM

Laura MacGregor

Professor, Gakushuin University


Thursday November 14, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
Yavapai

14:30

Academic Formulas List in Material Science: Intersecting corpus linguistics and expert knowledge
This study partially replicated the Academic Formulas List (AFL, Ellis, Simpson-Vlach & Maynard, 2008) and aimed to present a corpus-derived, pedagogically useful list of formulaic sequences for academic writing in Material Science. This expert formula list was then compared with student writing (non-native English speakers) at the novice and advanced level.

Speakers
YC

Yaqiong Cui

University of Chinese Academy of Science


Thursday November 14, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
Copper

14:30

Bilingual writing: Comparing revision behavior in the L2 German and the heritage language Turkish
Only few studies investigate revisions of bilingual students in the majority and their heritage language. The present study provides original data from bilingual writing, which shows the revision behavior of grade 6 students in their heritage language Turkish and second language German.

Speakers
YC

Yasemin Can

University of Cologne


Thursday November 14, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
Gila

14:30

May we tutor L2 writers in their native languages? Challenging the default use of English only in L2 tutorials
Whether "English Only" is always optimal in L2 tutorials at university writing centers is less researched. This study investigates the possibility of doing so from both nonnative English-speaking writing tutors' and L2 writers' perspectives, proposing that employing L2 writers' native languages when necessary, a critical agenda for writing centers.

Speakers
LW

Lan Wang

Assistant Professor of English, West Virginia State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
Chrysocolla

14:30

Pilot results of a mixed-methods study on developing intercultural competence through first-year writing courses
This presentation features the pilot results of Transculturation in Introductory Composition, a pedagogical research project designed to foster FYW students' intercultural competence (IC). We discuss our mixed methods approach in assessing students' IC development via their writings and interview data, and the positive impacts the pedagogy had on students' learning.

Speakers
avatar for Hadi Banat

Hadi Banat

Graduate Teaching Instructor, Purdue University
Hadi Banat is a rising fifth-year Ph.D. dissertation fellow in the English Department, Second Language Studies/TESL program at Purdue University. He teaches First Year Writing and Professional Communication. His research interests are in writing assessment, cross-cultural composition... Read More →
PT

Phuong Tran

Graduate Student, Purdue University
PP

Parva Panahi

Purdue University
RS

Rebekah Sims

Purdue University


Thursday November 14, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
Yuma

15:00

Afternoon Refreshments
Thursday November 14, 2019 15:00 - 15:30
Alumni Lounge

15:30

"It's a great way to start your college experience": The strengths and challenges of creating and piloting a multilingual first-year composition course
This paper describes the process of proposing, creating, and piloting multilingual composition courses to better serve growing numbers of L2 writers on campus. The presenter, a WPA, details results from a survey study of multilingual composition students and their L2 writing teachers, including both strengths and challenges of the pilot.

Speakers
avatar for Katherine Daily O'Meara

Katherine Daily O'Meara

Director of Composition, Emporia State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Gold

15:30

(Re)creating identities through writing: The case of a Syrian refugee-background family
This case study of a Muslim refugee-background family's writing practices uses the lens of artifactual literacies to explore the potential of this theoretical approach in better understanding how a multimodal approach to second language writing can document ways in which marginalized writers can (re)create powerful and agentive identities through writing.

Speakers
FK

Fares Karam

Assitant Professor, University of Nevada, Reno
avatar for Amanda Kibler

Amanda Kibler

Associate Professor, Oregon State University
Amanda Kibler is an Associate Professor in the College of Education at Oregon State University. Her research focuses on the language and literacy development of multilingual children and adolescents from immigrant backgrounds. This work has been funded by both the Spencer Foundation... Read More →
EO

Eleni Oikonomidoy

University of Nevada, Reno


Thursday November 14, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Copper

15:30

Emotions and L2 writing responses: What do teachers feel?
The presentation focuses on emotions of 20 Thai writing teachers in responding to student writing. Feeling bored, excited, and nervous was reported. Pedagogical implications will be provided.

Speakers
BC

Bee Chamcharatsri

Associate Professor, UNM
ST

Suthathip Thirakunkovit

Mahidol University


Thursday November 14, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Gila

15:30

Is my teacher present or absent?: The effects of written and spoken feedback on students' perception of teacher presence in an online writing course
This study investigates students' perception of teacher presence in an online asynchronous writing course by providing two different types of online tutor feedback—written feedback and spoken feedback—for students' writing assignments and how they connect the levels of teacher presence to the satisfaction in their learning.

Speakers
KP

Keira Park-Bern

Ohio University
ZZ

Zoe Zawadzki

Ohio University
RB

Robert Bern

Cyber Hankuk University of Foreign Studies


Thursday November 14, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Santa Cruz

15:30

Multiple case studies on undergraduate ESL students' learning to write process of L2 synthesis writing
The multiple case studies investigated how two undergraduate ESL students formed their notion of good academic synthesis writing and improved their composing process as they took a semester-long ESL composition course. The students' different learning to write process and outcomes and suggestions based on the results will be discussed.

Speakers
JH

Ju-A Hwang

The Ohio State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Chrysocolla

15:30

Myths or reality? A corpus analysis of prescriptions in published research writing
This study focuses on some of the frequently mentioned prescriptions in published academic research writing. Using the 20th Century Research Articles Corpus, this study illustrates that the extent to which academic writers follow prescriptions can show variation across disciplines and time periods.

Speakers
avatar for Tülay Dixon

Tülay Dixon

PhD Student, Northern Arizona University


Thursday November 14, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Yuma

15:30

Student and teacher views of the relative importance and difficulty of writing for ESL learners bound for English-medium universities
This study identifies discrepancies between ESL student and TESOL faculty perceptions in terms of the relative importance and difficulty of L2 writing amid other aspects of L2 language development such as reading, listening, speaking, grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation for IEP students preparing to study at an English-medium university.

Speakers
JH

James Hartshorn

Brigham Young University
BM

Ben McMurry

Brigham Young University
JH

Judson Hart

Brigham Young University


Thursday November 14, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Graham

15:30

Towards a quantitative model of understanding the dynamics of interaction in collaborative writing
This paper proposes a model of dyadic interaction that considers learners' contribution to different aspects of collaborative writing and identifies collaboration types in a bottom-up fashion. Drawing upon a quantitative analysis of learners' comparative involvement in major aspects of collaborative writing, a cluster analysis identifies five distinct collaboration types.

Speakers
MZ

Meixiu Zhang

Syracuse University


Thursday November 14, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Yavapai

15:30

Uncovering the ‘messiness’: L2 writing teachers’ experience of integrating multimodality into first-year composition
This study examines how two L2 writing teachers of first-year composition in a large state university constructed conceptions of multimodal literacy, enacted their espoused beliefs through the selection of semiotic resources, and negotiated multiple aspects of teaching second language writing.


Speakers
XT

Xiao Tan

Graduate Teaching Associate, Arizona State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Pinal

15:30

Computational techniques for linguistic annotation: An introduction to Stanford CoreNLP
In the presentation, we will first, explain ways of synthesizing Python codes with the packages developed by Stanford CoreNLP to conduct part-of-speech tagging (POS), named entity recognizing (NER), and syntactical parsing, including both constituency and dependency analyses, and second, discuss ways of applying a Python program that can call Stanford CoreNLP to complete a corpus-based study in a writing context. Sample codes and output will also be demonstrated in the presentation.

Speakers
avatar for Ge Lan

Ge Lan

phd candidate, Purdue University
I am a phd candidate in second language studies at Purdue, and my research interests include corpus linguistics, L2/EAP writing, and natural language processing. I have been working on corpus-based analysis on grammatical complexity (primarily noun phrase complexity) in L2/EAP writing... Read More →
QZ

Qiusi Zhang

Purdue University


Thursday November 14, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Arizona

15:30

Creative writing workshops as L2 instruction
This presentation argues that L2 students deserve the opportunity to enroll in L2 Creative Writing workshops, because this would allow them to use English in a way that focuses more on critical thinking than solely semantics. Learning this way would allow L2 students to excel in all areas of English.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Gallas

Stephen Gallas

Adjunct Professor of English, Lorain County Community College


Thursday November 14, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Arizona

15:30

Exploring twenty-seven years of Journal of Second Language Writing: A bibliometric analysis
The JSLW was established in 1992 and in 2019 it is approaching the three decades. According to the aim and scope of the journal “The Journal of Second Language Writing is devoted to publishing theoretically grounded reports of research and discussions that represent a significant contribution to current understandings of central issues in second and foreign language writing and writing instruction.”. The recent years have witnessed an increasing awareness in research methodological issues in the field of applied linguistics, which brought about what Byrnes(2013) and Plonsky (2017) have referred to as ‘methodological turn’ and ‘methodological awareness’, respectively. Along the same line, the field of Applied Linguistics has recently heard the voice of bibliometric studies with great contribution to the field. As such, this study measured the credibility of the journal under several quantitative and qualitative indicators. This retrospective-oriented study, adopting bibliometric and scientometric approach, was an attempt to develop cumulative and chronological analysis of all the publications of the journal. Given this, it tried to discover the significant contribution of the long-lasting journal in terms of research trends, impact, topics, authors (highly cited ones), universities, collaboration among the authors, and countries in the field of applied linguistics. Implications and recommendations for authors, editors, and research consumers are discussed.

Speakers
MA

Mohammad Amini Farsani

Iran University of Science and Technology
SA

Shahla Asadollahi

Indiana University of Pennsylvania


Thursday November 14, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Arizona

15:30

Metacognition and journaling: Managing stress in the L2 writing classroom
In this roundtable, an ESL instructor will share details of an in-class journaling project that incorporated metacognitive strategies for mitigating "emotional bottlenecks." The presenter will outline the predicted bottlenecks then share journaling prompts and relevant qualitative data to discuss the effectiveness of peer review with respect to affective issues.

Speakers
JD

Jenica Draney

Associate Instructor, Westminster College


Thursday November 14, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Arizona

15:30

More corrections lead to more attainments? EFL learners' uptake of written corrective feedback
The study aims to explore the effect of feedback scope on learners' uptake of written corrective feedback in EFL classrooms. To this end, an explanatory sequential mixed methods research design was adopted to investigate Chinese EFL learners' uptake of comprehensive, focused, and combined written corrective feedback.

Speakers
ZM

Zhicheng Mao

The Chinese University of Hong Kong
CL

Chen LI

The Chinese University of Hong Kong


Thursday November 14, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Arizona

16:00

CANCELLED: Efficacy of applying a combination of two types of corrective feedback on L2 writing accuracy
This study investigates the efficacy of a combination of two kinds of feedback: written correction feedback (WCF) and metalinguistic explanation (ME) on the accuracy of L2 papers in a First-Year-Composition course. The results indicate that the combination of WCF & ME is more effective than applying either of them individually.

Speakers
NH

Negin H Goodrich

Purdue University


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Arizona

16:00

A corpus-based analysis of the multiple ways to write publishable research articles
Through the use of automated language processing tools and cluster analysis, the current study has identified five groups of research articles that are linguistically distinct from each other in Biology and Medicine. The finding reveals the multiple ways to write publishable RAs that rely on different combinations of linguistic features.

Speakers
WZ

Weiyu Zhang

Nanyang Technological University
YL

Yin Ling Cheung

Nanyang Technological University


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Santa Cruz

16:00

A studio-course model of academic writing support for multilingual international students
This paper examines the effectiveness of a co-requisite studio-model writing course for multilingual international students at a medium-sized U.S. university. Findings show that students who completed the course performed better on average in first-year writing than those of comparable proficiency who did not. They also reported heightened intercultural awareness.

Speakers
avatar for Kyle McIntosh

Kyle McIntosh

Assistant Professor, English, The University of Tampa


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Gold

16:00

Attention to form in collaborative writing: LREs in two task conditions
This study examines intermediate EFL learners' attention to form in two task conditions: 1) collaborating in a shared L1 (Chinese); and 2) collaborating in the target language (English). Results showed that a shared use of L1 produced greater attention to form than collaborating in the target language.

Speakers
MZ

Meixiu Zhang

Syracuse University
WC

William Crawford

Northern Arizona University


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Yavapai

16:00

Concept-based instruction as an alternative approach to genre pedagogy: The case of writing thesis proposals in applied linguistics
Focusing on writing the literature review and the introduction sections of a graduate thesis proposal, the study compared the ESP and the CBI approaches to teaching academic writing genre to graduate Iranian students of applied linguistics. The results showed that the CBI group outperformed the ESP one.

Speakers
MR

Mohammad Rahimi

Shiraz University
MS

Mahboobeh Saadat

Shiraz University
avatar for Ali Kushki

Ali Kushki

Doctoral Student, Loyola University Chicago
Currently, I'm halfway through my doctorate in Curriculum & Instruction at Loyola University Chicago. My main interest is sociocultural understandings of second language teaching and learning and implications for and application to L2 writing. In particular, I am interested in Dynamic... Read More →


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Chrysocolla

16:00

Five years later: The longer-term impact of an intensive research writing course
This presentation outlines findings from a small-scale, qualitative case study of four Mexican life scientists' (two emerging; two established) scholarly writing for publication over time. Findings point to the longer-term impact of pedagogical interventions on plurilingual EAL scholars' dynamic, evolving research writing beliefs and practices over their academic trajectories.

Speakers
JC

James Corcoran

Assistant Professor, York University


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Graham

16:00

Identity and power relations: A case study of nonprofit adult ESL learners
This presentation is part of a larger qualitative study of a Knoxville, Tennessee, nonprofit that serves adult ESL learners. Findings deal with how adult learners perceive and respond to power imbalances in the community through humor, mock language use, and valuing safe spaces.

Speakers
AH

Abby Hassler

University of Tennessee


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Copper

16:00

Is writing knowledge being transformed? A longitudinal study of the role of L2 writers' agency in EAP to FYW courses
Although research in composition studies more recently has investigated what kinds of knowledge is brought to First Year Writing (FYW) courses through genre knowledge generally there has been a lack of empirical research that uses longitudinal, exploratory approaches to understand how L2 writers themselves re(shape) their knowledge about writing. This quantitative, exploratory study seeks to examine the role of students' agency in how L2 writers (re)shape and transfer writing knowledge from two similar yet different writing contexts.

Speakers
SL

Sei Lee

University of California, Irvine, Claremont Graduate Univ.


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Gila

16:00

Sociocultural theory revisited: Vygotsky's concepts and their use in recent research of teacher written feedback
This study examined Vygotsky's original tenets of sociocultural theory including the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) and scaffolded feedback and compared them to their use in studies of teacher written feedback in the past two decades. Suggestions for the applications of Vygotsky's sociocultural theory in future studies are provided.

Speakers
JS

Jet Saengngoen

Graduate student, University of New Mexico


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Pinal

16:00

Understanding L2 university writing: A lexico-grammatical analysis across registers
This paper investigates the use of eight complexity features in ESL students writing in their disciplines, adopting a lexico-grammatical approach to show how the grammatical features that students use relate to register. The results show that students do not seem to be aware of register variation with regards to complexity.

Speakers
avatar for Larissa Goulart

Larissa Goulart

Northern Arizona University


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Yuma

16:00

Real-life reading-to-write tasks in university settings: Authentic demands on L2 students
This study reports on real-life reading-to-write tasks in university settings in terms of the task features and required skills. Findings will inform the research and assessment community about what authentic reading-to-write tasks entail and help EAP instructors better understand the actual demands on L2 students and prepare them more effectively.

Speakers
JS

Jihye Shin

Northern Arizona University
FW

Fang Wang

University of Iowa


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Arizona

16:00

The impact of teacher metacognition on argumentative writing as a genre and a process: A case study of EFL writing classroom in the Mainland China
The present case study aims to look at how teaching with metacognition in argumentative writing affect student writers' understanding and practice of argumentative writing as a genre and a process and to explore the potential relationship between writing performance and perception of argumentative writing as a genre and a process.

Speakers
CL

Chen LI

The Chinese University of Hong Kong
ZM

Zhicheng Mao

The Chinese University of Hong Kong


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Arizona

16:00

WE and second language writing: Investigating pedagogical implications of world Englishes approach in an expanding circle context
This study investigates the pedagogical implications of world Englishes (WE) in an expanding circle context. The pedagogical implementation of the world Englishes approach faces many challenges for different reasons (Matsuda & Matsuda, 2010).

Speakers
YL

Yiyang Li

University of Connecticut
MS

Mona Syrbe

Rikkyo University
WV

Wei Vivian Xu

Durham University


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Arizona

16:30

Break
Thursday November 14, 2019 16:30 - 16:45
Alumni Lounge

16:45

"Writing-about-genre": Toward a transfer-based pedagogy for L2 writers
This presentation interrogates how the transfer-based curricula indigenous to rhetoric and composition might be adapted for the field of L2 writing, where transfer often remains a secondary curricular focus. Results of case studies indicate that such curricula can promote both adaptive transfer and meta-generic awareness.

Speakers
JW

Joseph Wilson

University of Washington
JP

Josie Portz

University of Tennessee, Knoxville


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:45 - 17:15
Copper

16:45

A multidimensional comparative analysis of English abstracts in applied linguistics: Do L1 writers' backgrounds matter?
The present study follows Biber's (1988) multi-dimensional analytical approach to explore linguistic variations in English abstracts written by writers from the Arab World and internationally. The results suggest similarities and interesting differences in how Arab and international writers structure their abstracts. The results and pedagogical implications will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Basim Alamri

Basim Alamri

Assistant Professor & Director of Writing Center, King Abdulaziz University
Basim Alamri is an Assistant Professor in the English Language Institute at King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia. His research interests revolve around topics related to L2 academic writing, including genre studies and corpus linguistics, and technology in the classroom.


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:45 - 17:15
Gila

16:45

Different task engagements in pair collaborative literacy tasks: Heritage and foreign language learners in the Japanese foreign language classroom
This study examines how a Japanese heritage language (HL) learner engages in pair collaborative literacy tasks with a HL learner and a L2 learner. Utilizing Vygotsky's sociocultural theory and the activity system (Engeström, 1987), the study shows how each learner's perceptions, goals, and motives are incorporated into their task engagements.

Speakers
YI

Yoriko Ito

Doctoral Researcher, International Christian University


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:45 - 17:15
Yavapai

16:45

Examining language ideologies and notions of correctness with first-year writing students
This presentation proposes classroom activities for first-year writing courses in which students examine notions of language correctness and monolingual ideologies, aimed at advancing linguistic social justice. Specifically, we share activities in which students analyze rubrics, investigate notions of nativeness, and act as ethnographers in surveying their communities' language ideologies.

Speakers
avatar for Jeroen Gevers

Jeroen Gevers

PhD Candidate, University of Arizona
JS

Jennifer Slinkard

University of Arizona


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:45 - 17:15
Graham

16:45

Exploring student blogs as rhizomatic maps: "Becoming" second language writers
The proposed study aims to delineate rhizomatic processes of 'becoming' second language writers in an international undergraduate second language writing composition classroom. Multimodal discourse analysis of students' blogs would be undertaken to develop a more holistic understanding of second language learners' struggles with transforming theoretical knowledge into practical apprenticeship.

Speakers
AD

Avrajit Dey

Arizona State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:45 - 17:15
Chrysocolla

16:45

Language education policies surrounding L2 adults developing first-time literacy and L2 writing skills
Leveraging a critical policy analysis, this paper describes the larger landscape of state and federal adult ESL education policies - adult L2 writing standards, level descriptors, assessments, and funding streams - and discusses how well current policies support the development of writing in L2 adults who lack L1 literacy.

Speakers

Thursday November 14, 2019 16:45 - 17:15
Gold

16:45

Learners' perceptions towards digital multimodal composing practices in an EFL high school classroom
This qualitative longitudinal study explored EFL learners' evolving perceptions of digital Multimodal Composing (MMC) in English composition courses over one year. Data came from three Korean adolescent students who engaged in eight MMC projects. Findings are discussed in light of digital MMC in the L2 classroom.

Speakers
SK

Sanghee Kang

Georgia State University
YK

YouJin Kim

Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:45 - 17:15
Pinal

16:45

The effect of mind mapping and outlining on Vietnamese EFL students' writing performance and attitudes: An explanatory sequential mixed methods study.
Methods of foreign language teaching in Vietnam’s higher education have been changed to a more learner-centered approach in which students are expected to become self-regulated learners. Increasing attention has been paid on integrated-skill approach in which writing has been claimed to be the most challenging skill for both teachers to teach and students to acquire. In a context that current writing practices focusing on form and error-free written products are exerting great pressure on EFL undergraduates who are beginning writers in the academic context and many of them lack confidence in their learning-to-write process, a growing amount of research has been done on the L2 writing process and the use of instructional strategies. However, several aspects need to be further explored comparing the effects of different handwritten types of pre-writing techniques on adult writers’ performance and attitudes and whether those effects would be transferred in a high-stakes condition. The proposed innovation study will investigate the effect of mind mapping and outlining as pre-writing techniques by looking at differences amongst control and treatment groups regarding: (1) the effects of the techniques taught on students’ writing performance, (2) students’ attitudes towards writing and their self-beliefs in completing regular class assignments, (3) whether the techniques would continue to be (effectively) employed even when not specifically required in a timed writing task. 

Participants are 60 first year non-English majors. Explanatory sequential mixed methods design will be employed in which qualitative data will be collected to test the hypothesis generated by quantitative methods. Pretest and pre-treatment questionnaire and posttest and post-treatment questionnaire will be administered at the beginning and end of a six-week treatment period to reveal the techniques’ effect on students’ self- efficacy beliefs and performance. After the treatment period, a regular mid-term test will be exploited as a transfer task to explore students’ actual uses of the techniques taught in a high-stakes condition. A subsequent comprehensive interview will be carried out to explain factors that influence their use. Extreme-case sampling by which the highest and lowest gainers in the pretest and posttest, and the users and non-users of the techniques during the transfer task will be intentionally selected to be interviewees. 

Based on the findings in literature and in my previous research on the unique contribution of mind mapping tool to improve secondary students’ writing ability, mind mapping and outlining – two specific instructional tools having characteristics of graphic organizers – are expected to have considerable effect on university students’ writing performance. Furthermore, these strategies are expected to decrease students’ mental effort and heighten their self-efficacy for L2 writing. I anticipate that the research will not only contribute to theories about the process writing approach but also support further research in the field of strategies to deal with L2 writing difficulties which is an important issue for students attending universities in the local context and overseas.

Speakers
VD

Vy Doan

PhD Student, Victoria University of Wellington


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:45 - 17:15
Yuma

16:45

University programmatic and administrative support staff perceptions of multilingual writers
This research presentation uses Activity Theory to situate and examine the perceptions of staff responsible for the programmatic and administrative support of multilingual writers at one state university. Through interview data, it explores the sometimes uncomfortable intersections of disciplinary expertise, programmatic responsibility, student learning, and organizational priorities.

Speakers
KP

Kate Parsons

Asst. Dir. Writing Center, Merrimack College


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:45 - 17:15
Santa Cruz

16:45

Correlating writer's block and ESL learners' writing quality
The study statistically looked into the writer's block experiences and levels of writing quality of Filipino ESL learners. The main purpose of the study is to describe the relationship between writer's block and the writing quality of the respondents.

Speakers
CG

Cecilia Genuino

Philippine Normal University, Manila and De La Salle University, Manila
JP

John Paul Dela Rosa

Tarlac National High School-Annex and Philippine Normal University,Manila


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:45 - 17:15
Arizona

16:45

Examining the literacy development of a multilingual 1st graders' English writing in a non-classroom context
This study examines what factors are involved in the literacy development of multilingual 1st graders who are in ESL and EFL. It also investigates how these multilingual learners approach writing tasks with various genres in a non-classroom context and develop their English writing through a variety of literate activities. In this qualitative case study, it discusses the pedagogical implications of their literacy development in a non-classroom context and seeks ways to effectively facilitate L2 literacy learning in a non-classroom setting with respect to classroom-based instructional learning.

Speakers
JK

Junghwa Kim

Graduate Teaching Assistant, Arizona State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:45 - 17:15
Arizona

16:45

Teaching writing through a genre-based approach: from novice to experienced EFL learners
This study explores how 27 first-year university students in two English proficiency groups changed their lexicogrammatical choices and understanding of metafuctions—ideational, interpersonal, and textual—of analytical exposition genre essays to become experienced writers through a 15-week course that implements a genre-based approach to writing.

Speakers
AN

Akiko Nagao

Ryukoku University


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:45 - 17:15
Arizona

16:45

Voice construction in L2 writing from the reader's perspectives: A literature review
This research helps understand how researchers in L2 writing approach the voice construction in written discourse by reviewing the literature in L2 writing. The author suggests more empirical research be conducted to understand L2 writer voice construction from reader's perspective, and the meaning negotiated by writers and readers through text.

Speakers
XH

Xuzhen Hao

PhD student, Arizona State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 16:45 - 17:15
Arizona

17:15

CANCELLED: Second language writing and basic writing: Teaching training and professional development for assets-based approaches
Professional development is needed to ameliorate long-standing deficit models for multilingual students enrolled in postsecondary courses called Basic Writing.This work is meant to add to existing arguments for an assets-based model. The implications are relevant for improving teacher training and professional development in courses called Basic Writing.

Speakers

Thursday November 14, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Arizona

17:15

Exploring the theory of adaptive transfer: How an L2 student reuses and reshapes English academic writing skills across ESL, FYW, and WC settings
Using adaptive transfer theory and qualitative single embedded case study, this presentation shows how an L2 student transfers, i.e., reuses and reshapes, academic writing skills across ESL classes, FYW classes, and WC consultations. Data were collected from documents, interviews, observations, and artifacts; findings are presented from content and text analyses.

Speakers
JJ

Janice Jung

Ohio State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Copper

17:15

Metadiscourse in research writing: The Pakistani perspective
This paper reports findings on a study aimed to investigate the frequency of metadiscourse in the research articles from various disciplines published in Pakistani academic journals and compare it with the research articles in international journals. The results indicated differences in frequency but no barriers in the meaning making process.

Speakers
avatar for Mubina Rauf

Mubina Rauf

Lecturer, Imam Abdurrahman bin Faisal University
I work as a lecturer in English in a university in Saudi Arabia. My research interests include academic reading and writing and assessment.


Thursday November 14, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Gila

17:15

Raising awareness on gender violence in literature in the writing classroom
This presentation will report on a discourse and visual rhetorical analysis on Dare to Disappoint: Growing Up in Turkey by Ozge Samanci to argue that comic books can help writing instructors create classroom spaces wherein students engage in candid discussions on social issues such as gender violence while learning academic writing conventions.

Speakers
MP

Maria Pilar Milagros

Bogazici University


Thursday November 14, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Graham

17:15

Reaching across the aisle: Designing cross-cultural composition classes
This presentation shares the results of a piloted cross-cultural composition section designed to promote cross-cultural dialogue among all students, domestic and international.

Speakers
GG

Ghada Gherwash

Colby College


Thursday November 14, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Santa Cruz

17:15

Scaffolding and assessing the self-regulated learning of L2 writing through strategically timed reflection tasks
Self-regulation is central to skilled writing, but supporting writing students' self-regulated learning (SRL) is difficult without detailed information about metacognitive engagement. This project explored the potential of serial reflection tasks, timed to coincide with key junctures in the SRL cycle, for scaffolding and assessing L2 students' self-regulated learning of writing.

Speakers
avatar for Jim Ranalli

Jim Ranalli

Assistant Professor, Iowa State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Yuma

17:15

Second language writing: A study of the learning and teaching of academic writing in a networked culture
By revisiting the traditional notions of contrastive rhetoric through the prism of multilingual networked culture that is grounded on new media and technology, this paper proposes L2 writing pedagogical approaches which will build on existing writing practices of students and be better adapted to our current networked culture.

Speakers
RP

Ramesh Pokharel

OISE, University of Toronto


Thursday November 14, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Chrysocolla

17:15

Team collaboration in L2 academic writing: A comparative study
From a socially situated and activity theory perspective, this paper analyzes how PhD students regulate L2 academic writing with team collaboration. Questionnaires, interviews and a comparative analysis of research proposals by group and individual PhD candidates indicated team collaboration facilitated students' recognition of epistemic stances and develop their identities as academic writers.

Speakers
HY

Hong Ye

China University for Political Science and Law
MD

Min Duan

China University for Political Science and Law
YL

Yadi Liu

China University for Political Science and Law


Thursday November 14, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Yavapai

17:15

World Englishes and the teaching of L2 writing: A collaborative autoethnography between TAs and faculty mentor
Answering Canagarajah's (2016) call to advance teacher development in composition, this presentation shares a collaborative autoethnography between TAs and faculty mentor. After a semester-long study of World Englishes, how have the participants' L2 writing instructional practices been informed and, in turn, how might the training of future TAs be reconceptualized?

Speakers
SH

Sarah Henderson Lee

Minnesota State University
avatar for Laxmi Prasad Ojha

Laxmi Prasad Ojha

Graduate Teaching Assistant, Minnesota State University
MK

Madhukar KC

Minnesota State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Gold

17:15

Writing to make meaning through multimodal composing: Does it facilitate L2 writing development?
In response to the debate on the benefits of multimodal composing, this study compared Korean EFL writers' writing development over time under traditional and MMC instructional conditions. The quality of writing under both conditions was analyzed and posttest scores compared to shed light on the pedagogical role of multimodal composing.

Speakers
YK

YouJin Kim

Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
DB

Diane Belcher

professor, Georgia State University
CP

Carter Peyton

Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology


Thursday November 14, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Pinal

17:15

Choices matter: Representation of voice and identity in L2 writing
Multilingual, thus, multicompetent writers make use of various discursive features while composing texts, representing their unique voices and multifaceted identities to say 'I'm here' even in spaces where it may seem 'non-standard'. This presentation is about the results of a case study conducted with multilingual graduate students writing in 'academese'.

Speakers
DY

Demet Yigitbilek

Graduate Teaching Assistant, Illinois State University


Thursday November 14, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Arizona

17:15

Exploring Written Corrective Feedback through the Perezhivanie Prism: A Vygotskyan Perspective
The present study investigated the potential of Vygotsky's concept of perezhivanie for L2 written corrective feedback (WCF). The work pulls evidence from a longitudinal study to shed light on how perezhivanie as a dialectic unity of emotion and cognition can contribute to a socioculturally-grounded furthering of WCF.

Speakers
avatar for Ali Kushki

Ali Kushki

Doctoral Student, Loyola University Chicago
Currently, I'm halfway through my doctorate in Curriculum & Instruction at Loyola University Chicago. My main interest is sociocultural understandings of second language teaching and learning and implications for and application to L2 writing. In particular, I am interested in Dynamic... Read More →
MR

Mohammad Rahimi

Shiraz University


Thursday November 14, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Arizona

17:15

Modernizing students' perception in EFL writing using culture-based approach and cognitive perspective
This paper examines subjective and objective hindrances among students. It also describes the use of culture-based approach and cognitive perspective to pinpoint Asian thinking and its influence on English performance, and to improve students' writing skill with detailed analysis on activities to be implemented in English classes.

Speakers
KV

Kieu Van Le Thi

Dean of Faculty of Foreign Languages, Nguyen Tat Thanh University, Vietnam
PL

Pham Le Nhat Linh

Lecturer, Nguyen Tat Thanh University
QT

Quoc Tung Nguyen

Ho Chi Minh City University of Education


Thursday November 14, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Arizona

18:00

Opening Reception
Thursday November 14, 2019 18:00 - 20:00
Engrained
 
Friday, November 15
 

08:30

Morning Refreshments
Friday November 15, 2019 08:30 - 09:15
Alumni Lounge

08:30

Registration
Friday November 15, 2019 08:30 - 17:00
Alumni Lounge

09:00

Exhibits
Friday November 15, 2019 09:00 - 17:00
Alumni Lounge

09:15

Plenary 2: Practicing agency in second language writing
The concept of agency has been widely discussed and used in many academic disciplines for various purposes. Yet, its definitions vary, and it is not uncommon that agency can be understood and perceived differently. As suggested by rhetoric scholar Gerard Hauser (2004), “there are divergences of what constitutes agency, and how it should be conceptualized (Saenkhum, 2016, p. 10). Additionally, the nature of agency that is debatable (Schlosser, 2015) has made agency one of the studied areas in several fields, including second language writing. In this talk, agency, as I defined in Decisions, Agency, and Advising: Key Issues in the Placement of Multilingual Writers into First-Year Composition Courses, refers to the capacity to act or not to act contingent upon various conditions. To explore agency in L2 writing, I will discuss how my theoretical framework of agency can be applied to various contexts, including theory, research, teaching, and administration, and consider how L2 writing specialists can practice agency in the field of L2 writing.

I will begin by reviewing different views about agency drawing from the work of scholars in related fields, including anthropology (Ahearn, 2001), applied linguistics (van Lier, 2009), and rhetoric studies (Callinicos, 1988; Flannery, 1991; Turnbull, 2004). While there is no consensus on agency, these views reveal that agency involves an act (Saenkhum, 2016). I will then consider a link between agency and action, propose conditions that make agency possible, and discuss my definition of agency. Specifically, I will share how I developed my conceptualization of agency through placement experiences of eleven multilingual writers who had the capacity to negotiate, choose to accept or deny placement, self-assess, question, and plan as they were making placement decisions. These acts of agency were performed when conditions for agency were optimal. Finally, I will discuss how my conceptualization of agency contributes to existing theories of agency and can be applied in other contexts than placement with the goal to maximize agency of students, writing instructors, researchers, and administrators.

Speakers
avatar for Tanita Saenkhum

Tanita Saenkhum

Associate Professor of Rhetoric, Writing, and Linguistics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Tanita Saenkhum is an Associate Professor of Rhetoric, Writing, and Linguistics at University of Tennessee, Knoxville, where she directs the ESL program and teaches courses in L2 writing, TESOL methods, and SLA. Her book, Decisions, Agency, and Advising: Key Issues in the Placement... Read More →


Friday November 15, 2019 09:15 - 10:15
Arizona

10:15

Break
Friday November 15, 2019 10:15 - 10:30
Alumni Lounge

10:30

Challenges in the acquisition of prepositions and articles in Saudi graduate learners
This study conducted a corpus-based error analysis on the acquisition of prepositions and articles by 60 Saudi graduate learners at a large American university. Findings show that students committed more article errors than preposition errors. Female participants also performed better than their male counterparts. Pedagogical activities for improvement are suggested.

Speakers
ST

Suneeta Thomas

Assistant Professor - TESOL/Linguistics, Missouri State University
HH

Hind Hind shafi

Missouri State University


Friday November 15, 2019 10:30 - 11:00
Graham

10:30

EFL students' engagement in peer feedback: An exploratory study
This study explored EFL writers' cognitive, affective, and behavioral engagement during their revision after receiving peer comments. The findings show that these students' behavioral engagement during revision is largely dependent on their affective engagement and the specifici explanations of identified problems in peers' comments.

Speakers
HM

Hui-Tzu Min

Distinguished Professor, National Cheng Kung University


Friday November 15, 2019 10:30 - 11:00
Yuma

10:30

First-year writing instructors' perceived challenges in working with international second language writers: An institutional case study
In this presentation, I report findings of an institutional case study that explored U.S. first-year writing instructors' preparation for teaching L2 writers, challenges encountered in doing so, and their ways of responding to the perceived challenges, as a means of eliciting and collecting information needed to develop faculty support programs.

Speakers
avatar for Zhaozhe Wang

Zhaozhe Wang

Purdue University


Friday November 15, 2019 10:30 - 11:00
Yavapai

10:30

Learning how to teach argumentative writing
This study presents the understanding of teaching argumentative writing by six ESL teacher candidates who participated in a writing tutoring program. Based on the changes of their perspectives, we argue that there is a need for explicit and structured instruction on how to teach argumentative writing in teacher education

Speakers
OY

Özge Yol

Doctoral Candidate, Binghamton University, SUNY
HK

Hoe Kyeung Kim

Binghamton University, SUNY


Friday November 15, 2019 10:30 - 11:00
Chrysocolla

10:30

Preservice EFL teachers' writing preparation in the Chilean context
This paper presents an ethnographic description of academic writing instruction in the Chilean university context. Preliminary findings suggest that writing is infused throughout coursework in multi-skill English language development courses, but mostly focused on preparing students for assessment.

Speakers
avatar for Betsy Gilliland

Betsy Gilliland

Associate Professor, University of Hawaiʻi Mānoa


Friday November 15, 2019 10:30 - 11:00
Gila

10:30

The impact and development of teacher language awareness in giving feedback on writing
This mixed-method study documents how three teachers' language awareness developed over time when giving feedback on student writing. Results suggest teachers may move through several "stages" of awareness and integration during which their language knowledge increases, is applied to real students, and is integrated with lesson planning and curriculum development.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Rosalia

Christine Rosalia

Associate Professor of TESOL, Hunter College
Mobile Learning: Virtual, Augmented and Mixed Reality,Teacher Professional Development (K-12 and adult teachers of ELLs),Writing Courses for English Language Learners,Instructed Second Language Acquisition,Service-Learning
AE

Anne Ediger

Hunter College


Friday November 15, 2019 10:30 - 11:00
Copper

10:30

Two doctoral colleagues in a US writing center: L1 tutor-L2 tutee role interactions
This study reports on interactions in an L1 tutor-L2 tutee pair related to the tutee's dissertation. Qualitative data including tutoring transcripts, interviews, and documents were inductively analyzed. Analysis revealed rich, complex inter-relations among multiple roles the tutor and the tutee played, in which their shared doctoral student status mattered.

Speakers
MF

Mayumi Fujioka

Professor, Osaka Prefecture University


Friday November 15, 2019 10:30 - 11:00
Plata

10:30

Higher education at risk: Disturbing changes to US universities and how they affect L2 writers
This colloquium explores a series of disturbing institutional changes that are taking place in US higher education and their implications for L2 writers and the field of L2 writing. Presenters will discuss the situation at their own institutions and share their experiences and strategies for responding to the situation.

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Crusan

Deborah Crusan

Professor of TESOL/Applied Linguistics, Wright State University
Deborah Crusan is Professor of TESOL/Applied Linguistics at Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio, where she teaches in the MATESOL program. Her work has appeared in numerous academic journals and edited collections focusing on second language writing. Her research interests include... Read More →
AS

Anthony Silva

Purdue University
LH

Linda Harklau

University of Georgia
avatar for Kate C. Batson

Kate C. Batson

University of Georgia
KM

Kate Mangelsdorf

Professor, University of Texas at El Paso


Friday November 15, 2019 10:30 - 12:00
Gold

10:30

The theory, research, and practice of multilingual genre learning
This colloquium explores how writers build genre knowledge and awareness across languages. We offer a theoretical framework for studying multilingual genre learning, share research and pedagogical explorations from various contexts, and consider prominent themes and possible future directions.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Tardy

Christine Tardy

Professor of English Applied Linguistics, University of Arizona
Christine Tardy is a Professor of English Applied Linguistics at the University of Arizona, where she teaches courses in TESOL, applied linguistics, and second language writing to undergraduate and graduate students. Her research interests include second language writing, genre theory... Read More →
avatar for Jeroen Gevers

Jeroen Gevers

PhD Candidate, University of Arizona
avatar for Bruna Sommer Farias

Bruna Sommer Farias

University of Arizona
ZL

Zhuxuan Li

Nanjing University
GG

Guillaume Gentil

Associate Professor, Carleton University


Friday November 15, 2019 10:30 - 12:00
Arizona

10:30

Designing, implementing, and assessing cross-cultural composition
Drawing from a multiyear study of a program's assessment and outcomes of cross-cultural composition as a placement option, this workshop offers participants strategies and materials for curriculum design and development, implementation, and assessment.

Speakers
avatar for Tanita Saenkhum

Tanita Saenkhum

Associate Professor of Rhetoric, Writing, and Linguistics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Tanita Saenkhum is an Associate Professor of Rhetoric, Writing, and Linguistics at University of Tennessee, Knoxville, where she directs the ESL program and teaches courses in L2 writing, TESOL methods, and SLA. Her book, Decisions, Agency, and Advising: Key Issues in the Placement... Read More →
HS

Hannah Soblo

PhD Student, University of Tennessee


Friday November 15, 2019 10:30 - 12:00
Santa Cruz

10:30

Plagiarism: Managing transgressions in genre, language, context, and organizations
This workshop covers recent advancements in plagiarism assistive technology and facilitates discussion about managing, learning from, and dealing with plagiarism to assist learning. Items for discussion include rewriting, ghost-writers, and copying across languages, genre, contexts, organizations, and journals. The discussion will cover pedagogical solutions including reconsidering instructional and assessment methods.

Speakers
DD

Daniel Dusza

LECTURER, 1966


Friday November 15, 2019 10:30 - 12:00
Pinal

11:00

"Collaborative writing of argumentative texts in pre-service Chilean English teachers using ICT tools in a blended design"
The objective of this research was twofold: to measure the effect of collaborative writing in the performance of pre-service English teachers when writing argumentative texts in English as anL2 by using Google Drive in a blended environment, and to compare such results with those of a control group working individually.

Speakers
LU

Lucía Ubilla

Universidad Católica de Temuco


Friday November 15, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Chrysocolla

11:00

Chinese university teachers' beliefs and practices of students' reflection in EFL writing
The study investigates how university EFL writing teachers perceive the role of students' reflection and how teachers use instructions to improve students' reflection. Results from individual interviews and classroom observation reveal different practice-belief gaps concerning students' reflection in EFL writing. Pedagogical implications for improving students' reflection in EFL writing are discussed.

Speakers
YW

Yubo Wang

The Chinese University of Hong Kong
LW

Lu Wang

PhD Student, The Chinese University of Hong Kong


Friday November 15, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Gila

11:00

Exploring L2 academic writers' self-beliefs through first-year university students' reflective journals
Using a qualitative approach, this study explores L2 academic writers' self-beliefs through reflective learning journals (N=74) written by freshmen engineering students in Finland. The study investigates L2 writing through L2 learner self-concept, writing self-efficacy and writing self-regulation with a particular focus on how these concepts may be interrelated.

Speakers
LM

Laura Mendoza

PhD student, University of Helsinki
TL

Tuula Lehtonen

Senior Lecturer, University of Helsinki


Friday November 15, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Yavapai

11:00

Linguistic dimensions of multilingual learners' written production: Exploring effects of task complexity, task sequencing, and online planning
The current study investigated the effects of task complexity, task sequencing, and online planning on the written production of multilingual learners and found significant effects of resource-directing (± reasoning demands and ± elements) and resource-dispersing (± planning) factors of task complexity on the complexity, accuracy, and fluency of written L2 production.

Speakers
MA

Mahmoud Abdi Tabari

University of Virginia


Friday November 15, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Graham

11:00

Pedagogical language knowledge for US college writing instructors
Presenter will share findings from case studies tracing college writing instructors' beliefs and knowledge about language and the ways in which such beliefs and knowledge are reflected in teaching. Findings suggest teachers need more opportunities to negotiate their linguistic beliefs and develop their pedagogical language knowledge in teacher education settings.

Speakers
MP

Madelyn Pawlowski

University of Arizona
Madelyn Pawlowski is a PhD candidate in Rhetoric, Composition, and the Teaching of English at the University of Arizona.


Friday November 15, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Copper

11:00

Student processing of teacher feedback on organization in expository writing
By using a longitudinal case study approach, this study investigated what students undergo when they are processing teacher feedback on organization, a subject area of research which holds particular promise, but so far has been explored by only a handful of researchers (Hyland & Hyland, 2006).

Speakers
XB

Xiaoyun Bian

Central University of Finance and Economics


Friday November 15, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Yuma

11:00

Why multilingual writers may avoid language tutorials
An investigation of multilingual writers who do not attend free, professional English tutorials suggests that, although these students recognize the value of tutorials, they may avoid visiting the center due to shyness and time limitations. Strategies to overcome these and other factors are included in this presentation.

Speakers
CM

Cristine McMartin-Miller

Associate Teaching Professor, Northeastern University
WW

Whitney Wotkyns

Northeastern University
EW

Ethan Whittet

Northeastern University


Friday November 15, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Plata

11:30

College composition teachers' beliefs about responding to multilingual students' writing
This study examines the relationship between L2 writing teachers' beliefs and practices when responding to multilingual college students' papers, in terms of teachers' nativeness, students' level, and different response modes. Findings will present the significance of writing teachers' awareness about teacher beliefs to develop meaningful responses to scaffold multilingual students.

Speakers
avatar for Yoon-Kyoung Chae

Yoon-Kyoung Chae

Indiana University
Ph.D. candidate, Indiana UniversityLecturer, University of California Irvine


Friday November 15, 2019 11:30 - 12:00
Copper

11:30

Expertise in teaching argumentative writing in a high-school ESL classroom: A longitudinal case study
This study explores how a high-school ESL teacher developed her expertise in teaching argumentative writing over two years using a classroom-based research methodology. The findings offer insights into the understanding of expertise in L2 writing instruction as well as the use of expertise as a tool for exploring L2 teachers.

Speakers
HJ

Hyun Jung Joo

The Ohio State University


Friday November 15, 2019 11:30 - 12:00
Chrysocolla

11:30

Longitudinal assessment of second language writing in higher education: The roles of language and cognition
This study examines adult L2 writing ability over time in relation to language and cognitive resources in higher education. Findings indicate greater L2-related knowledge is important in producing a higher quality of L2 writing, while working memory capacity is important in having greater gains in L2 writing scores over time.

Speakers
MK

Minkyung Kim

Nagoya University of Commerce and Business
avatar for Scott Crossley

Scott Crossley

Associate Professor, Georgia State University
Dr. Scott Crossley is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics at Georgia State University. Professor Crossley’s primary research focus is on natural language processing and the application of computational tools and machine learning algorithms in language learning, writing... Read More →


Friday November 15, 2019 11:30 - 12:00
Graham

11:30

More than treating errors: Teacher written feedback and neglect of discourse level writing
Teacher written feedback research and L2 writing teacher education have largely focused on WCF at the expense of discourse-level feedback. This presentation documents these disparities and details a research agenda for addressing discourse level feedback and ways that L2 teacher education can prepare teachers to provide discourse level feedback.

Speakers
avatar for Lynn Goldstein

Lynn Goldstein

Professor Emerita, Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS)
Lynn Goldstein is Professor Emerita ( TESOL, TFL and Applied Linguistics) at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS) where she has taught courses in sociolinguistics, the teaching of second language writing, applied linguistics research methods, intercultural... Read More →
RK

Robert Kohls

San Francisco State University


Friday November 15, 2019 11:30 - 12:00
Yuma

11:30

Rhetorical relations in the compositions of Chinese EFL learners and English native speakers
This paper investigates the rhetorical relations in the compositions of the Chinese and the American students so as to find out whether the two groups show similar tendencies in rhetorical relation types and frequencies and whether rhetoric instruction in English composition is still necessary.

Speakers
DL

Donghong Liu

Central China Normal University


Friday November 15, 2019 11:30 - 12:00
Gila

11:30

Students' use of proofreading: Purposes and practices in light of the ethical debate
An exploratory study revealed that students at all levels of a North American university pursued third-party proofreading to improve their writing and reported positive learning outcomes, yet some participants reported practices that might violate academic integrity policy. Implications for institutions and writing instructors will be discussed.

Speakers
NC

Nina Conrad

University of Arizona


Friday November 15, 2019 11:30 - 12:00
Plata

11:30

Writing beyond the obvious: The effects of tasks on student writing in ESL freshman composition
Drawing on the view of writing as knowledge-transforming, this paper explores the intertextual relationships between tasks and student writing in the context of ESL freshman composition. Findings provide useful insights into helping students, through careful task design, to go beyond "basic knowledge-telling" and engage in a more sophisticated "knowledge-transforming" discourse.

Speakers
JY

Jungwan Yoon

The Pennsylvania State University


Friday November 15, 2019 11:30 - 12:00
Yavapai

12:00

Lunch Break (On Your Own)
Friday November 15, 2019 12:00 - 13:30
Engrained, MU Food Court

12:15

13:30

A comparative study of lexical bundles by Chinese and native students of Applied Linguistics in the conclusion section of doctoral dissertation writing
The corpus-based study indicates that Chinese students use more lexical bundles than native counterparts in the doctoral dissertation conclusion section. Similarities and differences are found in the structural and functional use of lexical bundles between the two cohorts. It provides pedagogical implications for L2 writing.

Speakers
LD

Liming Deng

Wuhan University


Friday November 15, 2019 13:30 - 14:00
Plata

13:30

A longitudinal study of student writers: A summary of case studies of multilingual participants from first-year mainstream courses
The presenter shares a summary of case studies of the multilingual student writers who participated throughout a five-year longitudinal study of student writers from mainstream first-year writing courses in AY 2012-2013. The case studies highlight students' diverse linguistic and cultural identities, personal and academic writing experiences (including first-year writing assignments and those they completed in their disciplines), literacy narratives, and what they enjoy and value in their writing, as well as what challenges them in positive or negative ways.

Speakers
avatar for Tanya Tercero

Tanya Tercero

Instructor/PhD Candidate, DLIELC/University of Arizona
Tanya from Tucson. Talk to me about teaching online writing courses, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, Spain and flamenco!


Friday November 15, 2019 13:30 - 14:00
Yavapai

13:30

Genre classification of student writing: Methods and insights
Multiple approaches to genre classification are adopted in writing research, each with advantages and disadvantages. We compare several classification frameworks, drawn from corpus linguistics and WAC scholarship, then apply them to a corpus of first year L2 writing to consider what they make visible or occlude in analyzing student writing.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Tardy

Christine Tardy

Professor of English Applied Linguistics, University of Arizona
Christine Tardy is a Professor of English Applied Linguistics at the University of Arizona, where she teaches courses in TESOL, applied linguistics, and second language writing to undergraduate and graduate students. Her research interests include second language writing, genre theory... Read More →
avatar for Shelley Staples

Shelley Staples

University of Arizona


Friday November 15, 2019 13:30 - 14:00
Graham

13:30

Patchwriting and risk taking: Linguistic features of novice multilingual writers' paraphrasing practices
This presentation reports findings of a classroom-based qualitative study that examined the linguistic features of novice academic writers' patchwriting practices and how learners engaged in decision making and risk taking in the process. Implications for pedagogy and policy will be shared.

Speakers
QD

Qian Du

Associate Director of Academic English, University of California, Irvine


Friday November 15, 2019 13:30 - 14:00
Copper

13:30

Second language literacy development though poetry writing: An intervention study
Literacy development can be direct or indirect and we know relatively little about the ways in learning one genre influences the ability to function in another (Hanauer, 2011). This presentation discusses this issue by examining the effects of composing Japanese poetry, haiku in a second language on developing academic literacy.

Speakers
AI

Atsushi Iida

Associate Professor, Gunma University


Friday November 15, 2019 13:30 - 14:00
Chrysocolla

13:30

The challenges of designing national writing exams in a globalized era: Polish and Macedonian Matura exams
By examining English writing tasks on the Polish and Macedonian Matura, we contribute to the developing research on standardized tests and students' L2 writing competences in Europe. Our analysis of locally available materials reveals issues of authenticity and usefulness, and socio-economic factors that affect exam quality in each country.

Speakers
MB

Mira Bekar

Ss Cyril and Methodius University
avatar for Aleksandra Kasztalska

Aleksandra Kasztalska

Lecturer, Boston University


Friday November 15, 2019 13:30 - 14:00
Yuma

13:30

The impact of tutor-student interactions on multilingual student learning: A dynamic assessment approach
This study adopts the dynamic assessment framework to explore what tutor-student interactional features are (un)likely to lead to multilingual students' longer term acquisition. The findings highlight the power of dynamic assessment as an effective approach for facilitating multilingual students' acquisition of linguistic forms in one-to-one writing tutorials.

Speakers
YZ

Yelin Zhao

Assistant Professor, University of Delaware


Friday November 15, 2019 13:30 - 14:00
Gila

13:30

Breaking the chains of the five-paragraph essay: Putting theory into action
The survival of the much-reviled five-paragraph essay is partly attributable to the difficulty in communicating the benefits of genre-based writing pedagogies to teachers, curriculum designers, and material writers. The presenters discuss ways to change practices by putting L2 writing theory and research into action at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Speakers
avatar for Nigel Caplan

Nigel Caplan

Associate Professor, University of Delaware
Nigel Caplan is an Associate Professor at the University of Delaware English Language Institute, where he teaches ESL to international undergraduate and graduate students. His textbooks include Grammar Choices for Graduate and Professional Writers (Michigan), and two levels in the... Read More →
avatar for Ann M. Johns

Ann M. Johns

Professor Emerita, San Diego State University
avatar for Christine Tardy

Christine Tardy

Professor of English Applied Linguistics, University of Arizona
Christine Tardy is a Professor of English Applied Linguistics at the University of Arizona, where she teaches courses in TESOL, applied linguistics, and second language writing to undergraduate and graduate students. Her research interests include second language writing, genre theory... Read More →
avatar for Ulla Connor

Ulla Connor

Chancellor’s Professor of English, Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis
Ulla Connor is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Director of the International Center for Intercultural Communication at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. A native of Finland, she has taught ESL and EFL on five different continents. Her research has focused... Read More →
avatar for Deborah Crusan

Deborah Crusan

Professor of TESOL/Applied Linguistics, Wright State University
Deborah Crusan is Professor of TESOL/Applied Linguistics at Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio, where she teaches in the MATESOL program. Her work has appeared in numerous academic journals and edited collections focusing on second language writing. Her research interests include... Read More →
avatar for Estela Ene

Estela Ene

Associate Professor, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis
Estela Ene is an Associate Professor, Director of the EAP Program and Director of the TESOL MA Program at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. She conducts classroom-oriented and corpus-based research on L2 writing in ESL and EFL contexts. She has written about pedagogical... Read More →
avatar for Todd Ruecker

Todd Ruecker

Associate Professor of English and Director of Core Writing, University of Nevada, Reno
Todd Ruecker is Associate Professor of English and Director of Core Writing at the University of Nevada, Reno. His work explores the increasing diversity of educational institutions and advocates for institutional and policy changes to support multilingual student and teacher success... Read More →


Friday November 15, 2019 13:30 - 15:00
Arizona

13:30

The role of peer dynamics in L2 learning and L2 writing development: Peer collaborative writing, peer review, and peer tutoring
This colloquium examines how the different dynamics of peer collaborative writing, peer review, and peer tutoring contribute to both second language learning and second language writing development in L2 Spanish classrooms and in a writing center with L2 writers of English.

Speakers
BO

Brian Olovson

Kennesaw State University
EI

Emilia Illana Mahiques

Teaching Assistant, The University of Iowa
CS

Carol Severino

Professor, University of Iowa


Friday November 15, 2019 13:30 - 15:00
Gold

13:30

Global citizenship: Primary research and transparent assignments in L2 writing
This workshop will give participants the opportunity to brainstorm, discuss, and create transparent assignments inspired by the TILT project that offer students the chance to engage with global issues on a local level by conducting problem-based campus research, affording L2 students authority in their writing and communities.

Speakers
SB

Sydney Bassett

Auburn Global at Auburn University
Sydney currently works as an English Program Specialist at Auburn Global. Her interests include curriculum development, faculty collaboration, and socio-cultural adjustment of international students.
IP

Irene Pannatier

Auburn Global at Auburn University
DW

DeElla Wiley

Auburn Global Auburn University


Friday November 15, 2019 13:30 - 15:00
Santa Cruz

13:30

Providing language feedback without hindering free journal writing
When reading students' free journal entries, instructors often face the frustrating choice of either letting their students express themselves freely in writing and ignoring language errors or giving feedback and compromising the freedom and creativity of the journals. This workshop addresses solutions I have successfully incorporated in my ENG110 class.

Speakers
SZ

Sabina Zeynalova

Continuing Lecturer, Purdue University


Friday November 15, 2019 13:30 - 15:00
Pinal

14:00

"We have a customized writing service team with all Caucasians": Advertising "writing services" to second language writers
This presentation examines Chinese-language advertisements for and "writing services" at a Canadian university. These advertisements present an understanding of ghostwriting not as "cheating," but one of many possible services to assist students in their academic trajectories. Implications for teachers of L2 writing and institutions who wish to discourage these practices are discussed.

Speakers
DC

Daniel Chang

Simon Fraser University
Daniel Chang is a PhD student in the Faculty of Education.
avatar for Joel Heng Hartse

Joel Heng Hartse

Lecturer, Simon Fraser University
I'm a lecturer in the Faculty of Education at Simon Fraser University! My work on sociolinguistics, education, and writing has appeared in the Journal of Second Language Writing, Asian Englishes, Composition Studies, and English Today.


Friday November 15, 2019 14:00 - 14:30
Gila

14:00

A text broker's genre expertise for identity construction in personal statement writing
Constructing an "impressive" writer identity in personal statement (PS)--a high-stakes genre for university entrance--can be extremely challenging for English language learners. Drawing on analysis of a Chinese text broker's perceptions and strategies, this study identifies the genre expertise that shapes writer identity in PS writing.

Speakers
FX

Fang Xu

Professor, Nanjing University
MQ

Mier Qu

Nanjing University


Friday November 15, 2019 14:00 - 14:30
Graham

14:00

Acquisition of academic writing skills through comic narration
This study shows how narrative writing using comics can be used for paraphrasing skills necessary for academic writing, and introduces major characteristics of narratives written by low-intermediate EFL learners. The author will focus on how direct discourse in speech balloons in comics was converted into narrative texts.

Speakers
avatar for Takako Yasuta

Takako Yasuta

Professor, Fukushima Medical University


Friday November 15, 2019 14:00 - 14:30
Chrysocolla

14:00

Enhancing international L2 students' receptive and productive skills in English academic writing: An explicit method for integrating language and composition goals in a first year writing course
This paper presents a curriculum developed for international L2 (IL2) student writers in FYC courses at a large state university. Specified sections using the curriculum allow IL2 students to fulfill the university requirement for FYC while developing English linguistic proficiency to meet university language proficiency benchmarks for matriculation.

Speakers
AH

Anna Habib

George Mason University
avatar for Laurie Miller

Laurie Miller

Instructor & Course Coordinator, George Mason University
I teach first-year composition at George Mason University and serve as the Co-Course Coordinator of undergraduate composition classes for the INTO Mason International Pathways Program. I am currently working on a Ph.D. in Mason's Writing & Rhetoric program, and my research interests... Read More →


Friday November 15, 2019 14:00 - 14:30
Yavapai

14:00

The role of restricted collocations and learner and course variables in determining writing quality in assignments from a first year composition programme.
This quantitative paper reports on the relationship between sophisticated lexical collocation use and writing quality grades in a first-year composition programme. The paper looks at this relationship and how it is influenced by course and writer variables.

Speakers
LM

Lee McCallum

University of Exeter


Friday November 15, 2019 14:00 - 14:30
Yuma

14:00

The use of direct quotes in the literature reviews of master's theses and doctoral dissertations: A qualitative case study of international graduate students
This study investigates direct quoting in literature review drafts among five international graduate students from two perspectives: a product and a process of integrated writing and reading. By focusing on both aspects, the results contribute to a deeper understanding of how second language writers incorporate sources into their texts.

Speakers
RH

Romana Hinton

Graduate Teaching Associate, University of Tennessee, Knoxville


Friday November 15, 2019 14:00 - 14:30
Copper

14:00

What the dissertation writing guidebooks don't tell you
This presentation reviews aspects of the doctoral dissertation writing experience that L1 and L2 students and their supervisors may not have considered in detail if they have mainly consulted dissertation writing guidebooks and websites. These include student-supervisor relationships, goals of "perfection," health, identity transformations, and desires to escape before finishing.

Speakers
CP

Christine Pearson Casanave

Temple University, Japan Campus


Friday November 15, 2019 14:00 - 14:30
Plata

14:30

CANCELLED: "Do I need to cite that?" L2 writers' habits and perceptions of citing and using media in multimodal projects
The purpose of this study is to investigate L2 students' habits and perceptions of using and citing media for multimodal projects. 33 participants in an English Communications course in the UAE were surveyed and interviewed following two multimodal projects--1) a webpage on Google Sites including grammar tips, essay writing tips, and research tips, and 2) a short video connected to a semester-long research paper--to evaluate student practices and beliefs when citing and using digital sources.

Speakers
MA

Matthew Andrew

Khalifa University


Friday November 15, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
Copper

14:30

CANCELLED: Reflexivity in dissertation mentoring: An autoethnographic study of disciplinary becoming
Utilizing a collaborative autoethnographic methodology, this presentation reports on a study about the use of reflexivity and narrative inquiry in the dissertation mentoring activities of two transnational women, the advisor and the advisee, and transdisciplinary becoming of both women at different stages of their academic career.

Speakers
LS

Lisya Seloni

Associate Professor, Illinois State University
CS

Cristina Sanchez-Martin

Assistant Professor, Indiana University of Pennsylvania


Friday November 15, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
Plata

14:30

"Just correct me": Variation in multilingual writers' requests for and attitudes toward sentence-level feedback in the writing center
Focusing on sentence-level feedback, this paper contrasts three peer multilingual writers' usage of and attitudes toward the writing center by providing a triangulated analysis of appointment and client report forms between 2014 and 2019, a semi-structured focus group discussion, and a sample writing center session with one of these peers.

Speakers
SA

Salena Anderson

Valparaiso University


Friday November 15, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
Gila

14:30

A multidisciplinary approach to teaching ESL research writing in the multi-level language classroom
The transformation of modern science from monodisciplinary to multidisciplinary leads to cardinal changes in the forms and methods of teaching ESL research writing, which is a challenge in educational settings where academic writing is not the discipline of the curriculum. The paper presents an ESL research writing course that reconstructs real-life scholarly communication regardless of the level of English-language competence of the participants.

Speakers
EB

Elena Bazanova

National University of Science and Technology "MISiS"


Friday November 15, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
Graham

14:30

Exploring the influence of L2 writers' behavior during the planning stage on their writing performance
To address the lack of task-based research that examines writers' actual prewriting behavior, this paper explores the effect of L2 learners' use, type, and elaboration of prewriting strategies on their general writing performance and language use in timed essay writing. This study offers implications for writing assessment and task design.

Speakers
SH

Stephanie Hyeri Kim

Assistant Professor, California State University, Northridge
avatar for Anna Joaquin

Anna Joaquin

Associate Professor, California State University, Northridge
HY

Hyung-Jo Yoon

Assistant Professor, California State University, Northridge


Friday November 15, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
Chrysocolla

14:30

Keyboarding or handwriting? How should young students respond to writing assessments?
This presentation addresses how to determine test mode (online or paper-and-pencil) when assessing the second language (L2) writing of young students. Presenters will discuss challenges young L2 writers face when keyboarding responses, and share the results of a study investigating writing test mode for students in Grades 1-3.

Speakers
MC

Mark Chapman

Director of Test Development, WIDA at UW-Madison


Friday November 15, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
Yuma

14:30

The TPACK impact: A framework to guide professional development for second language writing teachers
Corpora are powerful tools for the second language writing classroom. However, they are not widely used by teachers, perhaps due to lack of teacher education. The current study integrates the Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge (TPACK) framework into professional development for in-service teachers and reports preliminary results from the study.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Schmidt

Nicole Schmidt

University of Arizona


Friday November 15, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
Yavapai

15:00

Afternoon Refreshments
Friday November 15, 2019 15:00 - 15:30
Alumni Lounge

15:30

Can you teach writing? Navigating the challenges of being non-native speakers teaching FYW in U.S higher institutions
This paper addresses the primary challenges that nonnative FYW teachers face in US higher institutions, and offers strategies to overcome them. Based on personal and academic experiences, the presenter discusses the intersectionality of identity and how it impacts teaching, research, and service.

Speakers
CP

Carolina Pelaez-Morales

Columbus State University


Friday November 15, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Gold

15:30

Comparing the self-perceptions and the efficacy of Spanish heritage language learners as authors: In search of an effective writing process
This study surveys the self-perception of twelve Spanish heritage language learners in regard to their performances (i.e., strategies) and attributes (i.e., efficacy) as writers with the intention of establishing whether these views match the participants' realities. As such, the study mainly focused on writing as a process; making a special emphasis on strategies pertaining to revision.

Speakers
LV

Laura Valentin

Kansas State University


Friday November 15, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Yuma

15:30

Empirical research on second language writing in China: A theoretical review
This research synthesis provides a comprehensive theoretical review of empirical studies on L2 writing in China. The researcher collected 660 journal articles and identified theoretical frameworks in each study. The results revealed the most frequently adopted theories by Chinese L2 writing scholars and were discussed from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Speakers
KY

Kai Yang

Purdue University


Friday November 15, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Chrysocolla

15:30

Entering a writing classroom with confidence: NNESTs' reflection on their pre-service training
Confidence building is one of the essential parts of NNES teachers' preparation. This session presents experience of two recent master's program NNES graduates who teach writing in the U.S. We name the elements of training and professional development that contributed to our confidence and preparedness for entering a writing classroom.

Speakers
avatar for Anastasiia Kryzhanivska

Anastasiia Kryzhanivska

ESOL Instructor, Bowling Green State University
avatar for Tetyana Bychkovska

Tetyana Bychkovska

Writing Center ESL Specialist, George Mason University


Friday November 15, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Gila

15:30

Evaluating students' improvement and gain in EFL writing from student-teacher conferences
This study examined the students' engagement in student-teacher conferences, their writing improvement, and their self-regulatory behaviors in revision. Data collection tools include student-teacher conference transcripts, students' drafts, and one questionnaire. The findings revealed students found such conferences helped them generate more ideas, clarify their writing structures/ideas, and understand their weaknesses.

Speakers
CC

Chung-chien Chang

Associate Professor, National Taipei University


Friday November 15, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Plata

15:30

Exploring the contexts of English academic publishing in Colombia: Findings from a nationwide survey
Drawing on questionnaire data from various Colombian universities, this presentation explores the context of English academic publishing among Colombian faculty and PhD students. We explore issues such as the various pressures faced by academics at different institution types as well as the role of unique systems of support available.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Ruecker

Todd Ruecker

Associate Professor of English and Director of Core Writing, University of Nevada, Reno
Todd Ruecker is Associate Professor of English and Director of Core Writing at the University of Nevada, Reno. His work explores the increasing diversity of educational institutions and advocates for institutional and policy changes to support multilingual student and teacher success... Read More →
GJ

Gerriet Janssen

Universidad de los Andes


Friday November 15, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Graham

15:30

How do L2 writers perceive and value praise in written feedback?
Our survey and interviews sought to understand whether L2 writers perceived and valued praise in written feedback. Results indicate that the type of praise, person or performance, matters when providing feedback, and that teachers should be aware of the impact each type has in their students' writing development.

Speakers
avatar for Grant Eckstein

Grant Eckstein

Brigham Young University
Research lines include response to writing, corrective feedback in L2 writing, and writing center research (especially L2 learners in writing centers). In addition, I use eye-tracking methods to research the acquisition and development of L2 reading.
KC

Karla Coca

ESL Instructor, Brigham Young University


Friday November 15, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Yavapai

15:30

They kind of make me hate writing”: Faculty mediation of linguistically-diverse college students’ writing development in disciplinary courses
Framed by activity theory, this study investigated discipline-specific writing development in 10 linguistically-diverse undergraduates, seeking to learn their perceptions of facilitators and inhibitors to their writing development and to identify sociocultural forces mediating this development. Key findings were students’ expressed need for more personal connection, explicit instruction, clear assignment expectations, and useful feedback from their disciplinary faculty.

Speakers
avatar for Julie Baer

Julie Baer

Lecturer, Northeastern University
My interest in multilingual writing studies evolved through my background in education, language, and literacy (EdD from Northeastern University Graduate School of Education; EdM from Harvard University Graduate School of Education). I have practiced in a variety of educational settings... Read More →


Friday November 15, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Copper

15:30

Leveraging stimulated recall for L2 writing research: The effects of design factors on data characteristics
This colloquium highlights the use of stimulated recall as a method for exploring various aspects of L2 writing processes and strategies. Four empirical studies using this retrospective interview, from both cognitive and sociocultural perspectives, are presented with a focus on the researchers' methodological choices and how various decisions influenced findings.

Speakers
CP

Charlene Polio

Professor, Michigan State University
JL

Jungmin Lim

Michigan State University
MK

Matt Kessler

Michigan State University
MT

Magda Tigchelaar

Assitant Professor, Western Michigan University
JL

Jongbong Lee

Michigan State University


Friday November 15, 2019 15:30 - 17:00
Arizona

15:30

Genre to the rescue: Designing a personally relevant ESL/EAP writing curriculum
Focusing on the literacy narrative (LN) genre as an example of personal writing, this workshop explores how course-initial, low-stakes writing tasks can be integrated meaningfully with other academic genres in a semester-long sequence so as to ease ESL writers' transition from everyday to academic literacies.

Speakers
SV

Stefan Vogel

University of Arizona


Friday November 15, 2019 15:30 - 17:00
Pinal

15:30

Using a learner corpus and a repository of pedagogical materials for L2 writing research and teaching
Our workshop introduces the first web-based archive that integrates a corpus of L2 student writing in first-year writing courses and a repository of pedagogical materials used for the courses. The participants will gain first-hand experience of using our web-based archive for L2 writing teaching, research, and professional development.

Speakers
JS

Ji-young Shin

Purdue University
avatar for Shelley Staples

Shelley Staples

University of Arizona
AJ

Ashley J. Velázquez

Purdue University
avatar for Hadi Banat

Hadi Banat

Graduate Teaching Instructor, Purdue University
Hadi Banat is a rising fifth-year Ph.D. dissertation fellow in the English Department, Second Language Studies/TESL program at Purdue University. He teaches First Year Writing and Professional Communication. His research interests are in writing assessment, cross-cultural composition... Read More →
AY

Ali Yaylali

Graduate Associate and Research Assistant, University of Arizona


Friday November 15, 2019 15:30 - 17:00
Santa Cruz

16:00

Can we move beyond fill-in-the-blank? Issues of writing in Nepali secondary schools
This paper reports results of interviews with 33 secondary teachers on the teaching of English writing in Kathmandu, Nepal. Key findings: a) Teachers do not possess a clear vision of academic writing in secondary schools. b) Existing methods rely upon pattern matching, fill-in-the-blank approaches to teaching writing in secondary school.

Speakers
RW

Rebecca Wheeler

Professor of English, Christopher Newport University
avatar for Laxman Gnawali

Laxman Gnawali

Professor, Kathmandu University
Dr. Laxman Gnawali is Professor of English Education at Kathmandu University from where he obtained his PhD. He holds one Master's degree from Tribhuvan University, and another from University of Exeter, UK. He leads teacher education and trainers training programmes at the University... Read More →
RA

Rachel Applebach

Christopher Newport University
JO

Jacqueline O'Hara

Christopher Newport University
RW

Rachel Wagner

Christopher Newport University
MA

Manuka Adhikari

Kathmandu University
avatar for Kumar Narayn Shrestha

Kumar Narayn Shrestha

Kathmandu University
GR

Ghanashyam Raj Kafle

Pashupatinath Mitra Middle School


Friday November 15, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Chrysocolla

16:00

Envision "EFL" L2 Writing Classroom Through the Lens of Affinity Space
This paper proposes Gee's "affinity space" as an alternative model and a powerful framework for L2 writing classroom in Expanding Circle to cope with three new challenges: globalization and the ELF (English as a lingua franca) trend, digital literacy development, and situated learning in authentic language contexts.

Speakers
EJ

Eva Jin

Arizona State University
MA

Maryam Almuhanna

Arizona State University


Friday November 15, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Plata

16:00

Exploring the relationships between research network participation and English language publishing: Survey data findings from one Colombian university
Following Curry and Lillis (2010), which addresses different relationships between research networks and English academic publication, this study uses questionnaires and longitudinal interviews to explore how PhD students and professors participate in research networks; how "being networked" intersects with article publication; and how the university can support network building.

Speakers
GJ

Gerriet Janssen

Universidad de los Andes
KC

Kelley Crites

Universidad de los Andes-Colombia


Friday November 15, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Graham

16:00

L2 written academic discourse socialization of English Education program in Indonesia
This ongoing research explores how L2 students of English Education department at an Indonesian university are socialized into and through written academic English in order to become English teachers, by focusing on what the writing practices are valued and how the lecturers socialize them into the target community.

Speakers
GP

Gatot Prasetyo

PhD candidate, The Ohio State University


Friday November 15, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Copper

16:00

Native speaker myth and fragmentation in composition: Analyzing legitimation codes of English composition ITAs
Through focus groups, interviews, and questionnaires, 15 international TAs discussed fallacies about composition. Using Legitimation Code Theory, we argue that by emphasizing attributes these fallacies prevent non-native English-speaking teachers (NNESTs) of composition from professional legitimacy. We argue that emphasizing information and skills in composition can help legitimize NNESTs.

Speakers
avatar for Aleksandra Kasztalska

Aleksandra Kasztalska

Lecturer, Boston University
MM

Michael Maune

Carnegie Mellon University Qatar


Friday November 15, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Gila

16:00

Using a feedback-rich framework to engage second language writers with revision: A pedagogical model from a teacher's perspective in college composition
This presentation reports on the principles of effective feedback practices, followed by a narrative example of a feedback-rich environment that embodies these principles. This study helps writing teachers see the value of creating more opportunities for interactive feedback in the first-year composition classroom for second language writers.

Speakers
KM

Kyung Min Kim

visiting assistant professor, Miami University OH


Friday November 15, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Yavapai

16:00

Visualising L2 students' essay writing processes with Draftback and pairtalk
Research on writing processes has remained a key area of interest in SLA. Very few studies however have examined the impact learners' individual approaches has on their collaborative writing approaches and vice versa. This study aims to investigate how learners approach individual and collaborative writing through language and tools on GoogleDocs.

Speakers
AS

Annita Stell

The University of Queensland


Friday November 15, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Yuma

16:30

A mediation model of affective regulation writing strategies and English performance for Chinese university EFL writers
The study included affective regulation writing strategies in SRL writing strategy model. Both direct predictive influence of affective regulation writing strategies on English performance and indirect paths as mediated other SRL strategies (cognitive, metacognitive, social-behavioral) were confirmed using structural equation model. No moderation effect of gender and major was found.

Speakers
BS

Bin Shen

PhD candidate, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
BB

Barry Bai

Chinese University of Hong Kong


Friday November 15, 2019 16:30 - 17:00
Plata

16:30

A survey study on peer review at Taiwan-based English-medium journals and potential ways to enhance multilingual scholars' publishing expertise
English L2 scholars may perceive writing research in English as a barrier to publishing. Using an online survey distributed to editors of 30 Taiwan-based journals, this study investigates the blind peer review process and ways explicit training may be incorporated into English-medium journal publishing to enhance multilingual scholars' expertise.

Speakers
CL

Cheryl L. Sheridan

National Chengchi University


Friday November 15, 2019 16:30 - 17:00
Graham

16:30

Afghan students' challenges in English academic writing and the perceptions of their needs in American universities
This presentation focuses on the Afghan graduate students' challenges in English academic writing and the perceptions of their needs to overcome them. It presents the results of the study from an extensive survey and interviews with graduate students across disciplines in US universities. Finally, it provides solutions and broader implications.

Speakers
MA

Mariam Alamyar

Student & lecturer, Purdue


Friday November 15, 2019 16:30 - 17:00
Copper

16:30

Exploring writing teachers' changing beliefs about critical thinking: Three cases in an EFL context
The present study investigated three EFL writing teachers' beliefs about CT and how their beliefs changed when they attempted to teach CT within their situated context. Results showed that teachers' beliefs about CT experienced different processes of change as they experimented with CT instruction in their EFL writing classrooms.

Speakers
MZ

Min Zou

PhD student, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
My research interest includes critical thinking and L2 writing


Friday November 15, 2019 16:30 - 17:00
Yuma

16:30

The Intersections of Identities in International Teaching Assistants of First Year Writing.
This study uses an intersectional approach to investigate teacher identity in International Teaching Assistants of FYW in various administrative and teaching contexts. Findings showed that their teacher identity was the intersection of multiple "done" and "undone" identities across time and spaces, and impacted by pedagogical, linguistic, cultural and classroom factors.

Speakers
YS

Yachao Sun

Purdue University
PT

Phuong Tran

Graduate Student, Purdue University
KT

Kenny Tanemura

Purdue University


Friday November 15, 2019 16:30 - 17:00
Gila

16:30

Writing practices of emergent trilingual students in South Korea
We report findings from our longitudinal qualitative case study about ways in which emergent trilingual students in South Korea used three languages (English, Korean, and Russian) for their writing practices across varied contexts. Our findings give us valuable insights into the nature of and pedagogy for adolescent multilingual writing.

Speakers

Friday November 15, 2019 16:30 - 17:00
Chrysocolla

16:30

Written corrective feedback: Does the frequency of editing episodes matter?
We investigated the timing effect of written corrective feedback among graduate L2 writers by comparing those who edited their writing at the end of the semester with those who edited daily. Results over 13 weeks suggest that frequent editing did not lead to greater gains in syntactic accuracy and complexity.

Speakers
avatar for Grant Eckstein

Grant Eckstein

Brigham Young University
Research lines include response to writing, corrective feedback in L2 writing, and writing center research (especially L2 learners in writing centers). In addition, I use eye-tracking methods to research the acquisition and development of L2 reading.
LH

Lisa Hoffman

Brigham Young University


Friday November 15, 2019 16:30 - 17:00
Yavapai

17:00

Break
Friday November 15, 2019 17:00 - 17:30
Alumni Lounge

17:15

An exploratory study of online writing assessment in an intensive English program
As technology has developed and become increasingly integral in educational programs, online language assessment tools have proliferated. This presentation is an exploratory, qualitative study of how web-based writing placement has developed over time. A discussion of rubric development will offer insights for those investigating similar transitions for their programs.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Kopec

Stephen Kopec

Lecturer, University of Pennsylvania - English Lang. Programs
AT

Amanda Thompson

University of Pennsylvania


Friday November 15, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Gila

17:15

Ask an advisor: Developing a writing-to-communicate project to connect students to experts in their field of study
Our students struggled to find experts to interview for their writing project while our IEP advisors struggled to get students to participate in an advising fair for their majors: a recipe for collaboration! Come learn how we connected these events and the feedback we received from the participants.

Speakers
RS

R. Scott Partridge

Assistant Professor, University of Delaware ELI
BM

Blythe Milbury-Steen

Academic Advisor, English Language Institute, University of Delaware


Friday November 15, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Plata

17:15

Building international relationships: Suggestions from writing program outreach in Chinese universities
In this panel presentation, I discuss the administrative and pedagogical rewards and challenges of fostering international agreements, specifically from my small STEM institution's Writing Program's successful experiences conducting outreach, exchange programs, and transfer agreements with the Yangtze University in China.

Speakers
JP

Jesse Priest

New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology


Friday November 15, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Santa Cruz

17:15

Developing a graduate-level ESP course
This presentation illustrates steps taken to move an EAP-focused foundational graduate writing course to an ESP writing course. This includes the preparatory needs analysis and course design as well as adjustments made after teaching the course a few times.

Speakers
SS

Stacy Sabraw

Instructor, Duke University, English for International Students


Friday November 15, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Pinal

17:15

L2 undergraduates' video engagement in discussion board peer review activities
An acknowledged writing activity, peer review is challenging among L2 students. This presentation compares L2 undergraduates' online discourse using asynchronous video communication to that of written text during peer review activities in discussion boards. The purpose is to learn if video improves peer interaction and connection to the draft.

Speakers
avatar for Grazia Rechichi Svokos, Ed.D.

Grazia Rechichi Svokos, Ed.D.

English Adjunct, Northeastern University College of Professional Studies
I am interested in all things related to eLearning and internationalization of higher education. Proud globalist - I was born in Calabria (Italy); reared in Brooklyn; married in New Jersey; raised children in Missouri; started teaching by the time we got to Boston; and currently (when... Read More →


Friday November 15, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Yavapai

17:15

Professional socialization of a novice second language writing teacher
This study aims to explore how a novice teacher of English-as-a-second-language writing (ESLW) at a large American university is socialized professionally in the initial stages of her development. An auto-ethnographic study by one such teacher-researcher can inform future teachers, as well as administrators and others responsible for preparing them.

Speakers
JD

Juhyun Do

Janggi Elementary School


Friday November 15, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Gold

17:15

Providing feedback to non-English L2 writing
Most L2 writing feedback literature is geared toward ESL writing, some toward EFL writing, and very little toward non-English L2 writing. Giving feedback on non-English L2 writing differs from giving feedback on English-language writing, primarily because of syntactic, morphological, and sociolinguistic differences. Suggestions for pedagogy and future research are provided.

Speakers
MR

Melinda Reichelt

Professor of English, University of Toledo


Friday November 15, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Graham

17:15

Synthesizing the eight studies on dynamic written corrective feedback: A meaningful and well-received intervention
In this presentation, I synthesize the eight empirical studies that have been conducted thus far indicating that Dynamic Written Corrective Feedback (DWCF) helps L2 writers improve their written grammatical accuracy. Evidence suggests that DWCF can be easily adapted to various contexts and is typically well received by students and teachers.

Speakers
KK

Kendon Kurzer

Lecturer, University of California, Davis


Friday November 15, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Arizona

17:15

Test repeater's text borrowing behavior and features of borrowed texts
Using a longitudinal approach, we analyzed 40 test-takers' responses across three takes to a source-based writing task in a standardized English proficiency test. Data were qualitatively analyzed for text-borrowing behavior and features of texts borrowed. Development of text-borrowing strategies over time and implications for teaching and testing will be discussed.

Speakers
HR

Haoshan Ren

Georgia State University
SK

Sanghee Kang

Georgia State University
XL

Xian Li

Georgia State University


Friday November 15, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Yuma

17:15

The role of microaggression in the English-Only classroom of two non-native English teachers.
In this session two nonnative-English speaking teachers will share their experiences of their subconscious acceptance of the English-only policy because of microaggression and their transformative processes in the conscious rejection of the policy in the US educational setting. The speakers will reflect on the self-depreciation of their L1 linguistic resources and share pedagogical implications in debunking the English-only policy in the English language classrooms.

Speakers
BC

Bee Chamcharatsri

Associate Professor, UNM
avatar for Romaisha Rahman

Romaisha Rahman

PhD Student & Graduate Assistant, University of New Mexico


Friday November 15, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Chrysocolla

17:15

Within-group comparisons of bilingual writing: Evidence for interrelatedness and transfer effects
Second language writers are by definition bi- or multilingual language users. In this paper, we explore connections and transfer between writing in more than one language, reporting on two projects showing evidence of interlingual transfer in writing of secondary school students and interlingual similarities in process data from university L2-learners.

Speakers
NM

Nicole Marx

Full Professor, University of Cologne
MR

Marie-Christin Reichert

Universität Bremen


Friday November 15, 2019 17:15 - 17:45
Copper

17:45

"That was not really something you talked about": Exploring language policy in a first-year writing program
This presentation reports on a year-long ethnographic study of how language policies are formed and implemented in a first-year writing program at a large university in the American Southwest.

Speakers
JS

Jennifer Slinkard

University of Arizona


Friday November 15, 2019 17:45 - 18:15
Chrysocolla

17:45

Assumed versus intentional teaching for transfer: Recommendations for making transfer work in an ESL composition classroom
Transfer of learning is at the heart of education, and the ESL composition classroom operates on the very notion of transfer, increasing the likelihood of taking it for granted and making it all the more necessary to intentionally foster a rich transfer climate and motivate students to transfer their learning.

Speakers
TR

Tamara Roose

The Ohio State University


Friday November 15, 2019 17:45 - 18:15
Copper

17:45

Collaborative language learning through peer feedback in L2 Spanish writing
This study examines how L2 Spanish learners can offer effective feedback and improve their writing proficiency from the peer review process. Results showed that by producing structural comments associated with text coherence and cohesion, trained peer reviewers are able to improve their comment effectiveness towards their peers' texts, writing quality during revisions, and their own writing abilities.

Speakers

Friday November 15, 2019 17:45 - 18:15
Graham

17:45

Factors influencing multilingual writers' self-placement into multilingual vs. standard writing courses
The study investigates the factors influencing multilingual students' decisions into mainstream course vs. multilingual section. Multilingual students' initial placement decisions via online DSP were compared to actual writing course enrollment data, then a post-DSP survey and interviews were conducted to examine to what extent students' placement decisions were influenced and changed by after-DSP factors.

Speakers
GL

Grace Lee-Amuzie

Assistant Professor, Penn State University


Friday November 15, 2019 17:45 - 18:15
Santa Cruz

17:45

L2 writers' experience with peer review in first-year writing: Socioacademic dimensions
This presentation explores the peer review experiences of L2 international students enrolled in a mainstream first-year writing (FYW) that was primarily populated with American students who spoke English as their first language. It highlights key findings from a qualitative research study and discusses implications for teaching and learning.

Speakers
MS

Megan Siczek

Assistant professor, George Washington University


Friday November 15, 2019 17:45 - 18:15
Yavapai

17:45

Multilingual students and plagiarism in First-Year writing courses: Analysis of their perception on plagiarism and use of reference management systems as a preventative tool
This study intends to analyze multilingual students' perceptions on plagiarism in ESL writing and their use of web-based reference tools as a method to prevent plagiarism leading to a competent researcher-writer. Student satisfaction with the tools will also be shared to help teachers choose a right tool for their students.

Speakers
MK

Minsun Kim

Miami University


Friday November 15, 2019 17:45 - 18:15
Yuma

17:45

Professionalization as a collective pursuit: Collaboration and knowledge exchange in an L2 writing teacher community
This presentation reports a qualitative case study on professional identity and collaboration among second language writing teachers using interviews and observations. The findings indicate that, though understudied in applied linguistics, collaboration and knowledge exchange are important aspects of teacher professional development. Practical implications for writing program administrators will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Jeroen Gevers

Jeroen Gevers

PhD Candidate, University of Arizona
avatar for Serdar Acar

Serdar Acar

PhD Candidate, University of Arizona
My research interests center around genre pedagogy, genre-based writing assessment, multiliteracies for teaching writing, and assessment for learning in L2 writing classrooms.


Friday November 15, 2019 17:45 - 18:15
Gold

17:45

Promoting a global community of writers through the lens of emancipatory pedagogy
Illuminating on a multitude of perspectives drawn from a diverse group of First-year Composition (FYC) instructors, and students, this qualitative study intends to capture an understanding whether it is possible to gravitate toward the meaning in multilingual writing shifting the mindset from gravity of grammar encapsulated in the standard English.

Speakers
GN

Gul Nahar

University of Oklahoma


Friday November 15, 2019 17:45 - 18:15
Pinal

17:45

Second language writers in online writing courses: Challenges and pedagogical strategies
This paper presents the results of a mixed-methods inquiry into second language writers' experiences in mainstream online writing courses. Drawing on the survey responses of a hundred L1 and L2 student participants, the presenter discusses the challenges writers faced, comparing L1 and L2 students' experiences and suggesting pedagogical implications.

Speakers
avatar for Mariya Tseptsura

Mariya Tseptsura

Assistant Director of Composition, University of New Mexico
Mariya Tseptsura is Assistant Director of Composition at the University of Nevada Las Vegas where she coordinates UNLV’s online writing courses. Her research focuses on supporting multilingual students in writing courses across delivery modes and advocating for greater accessibility... Read More →


Friday November 15, 2019 17:45 - 18:15
Gila

17:45

Two nations, one goal: US and Russian universities collaborating to improve their academic writing centers
This presentation will highlight the planning and implementation activities as well as the successful outcomes of a yearlong, grant-funded project that assisted a Russian university in expanding and improving its academic English writing center by observing best-practices and collaborating with an established writing resource program in the U.S.

Speakers
RC

Robert Cote

Director, Writing Skills Improvement Program, University of Arizona
avatar for Andrea Hernandez Holm

Andrea Hernandez Holm

Coordinator Senior, Writing Skills Improvement Program, University of Arizona
I am currently the Senior Program Coordinator for the Writing Skills Improvement Program at the University of Arizona. I am a writing specialist and provide tutoring, teaching, and editing to writers both inside and outside of the university. I also facilitate our Graduate Writing... Read More →


Friday November 15, 2019 17:45 - 18:15
Plata

17:45

Written corrective feedback: Is less more?
This paper explores the efficacy of focused written corrective feedback (WCF) in a Grade 7 classroom. The findings show how the teacher implements focused WCF in the traditional writing classroom dominated by comprehensive WCF, and what teacher and students think about the effectiveness of focused WCF.

Speakers
avatar for Icy Lee

Icy Lee

Professor at the Faculty of Education, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Icy Lee is a Professor at the Faculty of Education of The Chinese University of Hong Kong, where she is currently serving as Chair of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Her research interests include second language writing, classroom assessment and feedback, and second... Read More →


Friday November 15, 2019 17:45 - 18:15
Arizona
 
Saturday, November 16
 

08:30

Morning Refreshments
Saturday November 16, 2019 08:30 - 09:15
Alumni Lounge

08:30

Registration
Saturday November 16, 2019 08:30 - 12:00
Alumni Lounge

09:00

Exhibits
Saturday November 16, 2019 09:00 - 12:00
Alumni Lounge

09:15

Plenary 3: Enacting agency for second language writers and their teachers in an era of neoliberal education reform
Neoliberalism is a political philosophy which prioritizes the role of free markets and competition in making a better society. As Hursh (2007) noted, neoliberalism has been the basis of much education reform over the last few decades and is defined by a few characteristics: a focus on high stakes testing and accountability as introducing “efficiency, accountability, fairness, and equality” in the education system and a focus on standardized tests as providing a “‘quality indicator’ to the consumer and ‘objective assessments’ of student learning within education markets” (pp. 499-500). Often compared to Foucault’s metaphor of the panopticon (e.g. Perryman, 2006; Wilkins & Wood, 2009), these assessment regimes are technologies used to regulate teachers, administrators, and students and get them to perform in particular ways to meet expectations set for them at the state and national levels. As well-documented in Ruecker and Crusan (2018), these reforms have impacted the teaching of L2 writing throughout the world as teachers feel compelled to teach to poorly-designed tests that don’t reflect pedagogical and curricular approaches that our field values.

In this talk, the presenter uses Foucault’s theories of discipline and governmentality as he draws his experience teaching and researching in the southwestern U.S. to explore how state and federal policies have worked to standardize both high school and college writing curricula and constrain the agency of writing teachers to teach to the linguistic and cultural resources that their L2 writers bring to the classroom. He then explores the way that teachers can enact agency in the face of seemingly oppressive forces through curriculum design, rethinking pedagogical approaches, and engaging in advocacy locally and in broader contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Ruecker

Todd Ruecker

Associate Professor of English and Director of Core Writing, University of Nevada, Reno
Todd Ruecker is Associate Professor of English and Director of Core Writing at the University of Nevada, Reno. His work explores the increasing diversity of educational institutions and advocates for institutional and policy changes to support multilingual student and teacher success... Read More →


Saturday November 16, 2019 09:15 - 10:15
Arizona

10:15

Break
Saturday November 16, 2019 10:15 - 10:30
Alumni Lounge

10:30

Disciplinary writing feedback: L2 practice, preference, and perception
Based on the findings from a broader dissertation on disciplinary writing feedback, the researcher presents the L2-specific findings focused on undergraduate misalignment with instructor writing preferences, graduate student re-alignment with instructor writing preferences, and reported differences in where students seek writing help in upper-division disciplinary courses.

Speakers
JW

Jacob Witt

Associate Professor, Northwest University


Saturday November 16, 2019 10:30 - 11:00
Plata

10:30

Dynamic assessment of academic writing among L2 learners of English
This study investigates the application of Dynamic Assessment (DA) in diagnosing and promoting L2 English learners' academic writing development. The study compares learners' writing abilities as revealed by DA versus non-DA, and it includes an individualized, instructional intervention program targeting learner needs and abilities informed by the DA procedure.

Speakers
LY

Lu Yu

Pennsylvania State University
MP

Matthew Poehner

Pennsylvania State University


Saturday November 16, 2019 10:30 - 11:00
Copper

10:30

The impact of a translingual curriculum in first-year writing
I propose to present a faculty and student versions of a translingual writing curriculum that will be launched online toward the end of January 2019. The writing faculty utilizing the curriculum sites in their courses will pilot, reflect on and present the impact of the curriculum on their professional development.

Speakers
KB

Kamal Belmihoub

Baruch College, City University of New York
MN

Michael Natriello

Baruch College
SP

Sabina Pringle

Non-Teaching Adjunct, Adjunct Lecturer, Baruch College


Saturday November 16, 2019 10:30 - 11:00
Chrysocolla

10:30

A longitudinal study of stance on L2 writing
Interactional metadiscourse strategies (Hyland, 2005), such as clear perspective (stance), are important to effective argumentative writing. To fill the gap in corpus-based research on undergraduate L2 writer stance, our colloquium will describe the interactional metadiscourse strategies in 152 college essays produced by twenty-one L2 college writers.

Speakers
SC

Shireen Campbell

Professor of English, Davidson College
RF

Rebeca Fernandez

Davidson College
avatar for Jack Hardy

Jack Hardy

Assistant Professor, Emory University


Saturday November 16, 2019 10:30 - 12:00
Yuma

10:30

Second language writing across PK16 contexts: Intersections of teaching, learning, and development
Research on SLW across educational contexts focuses primarily on higher education. To date, there have been no studies which look across PK16 context, to see intersections of teaching,
learning, and development of academic writing. Panelists in this presentation will discuss research, theory and pedagogy on SLW across PK16 contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Ruecker

Todd Ruecker

Associate Professor of English and Director of Core Writing, University of Nevada, Reno
Todd Ruecker is Associate Professor of English and Director of Core Writing at the University of Nevada, Reno. His work explores the increasing diversity of educational institutions and advocates for institutional and policy changes to support multilingual student and teacher success... Read More →
CP

Christine Pearson Casanave

Temple University, Japan Campus
avatar for Cate Crosby

Cate Crosby

Associate Professor & Program Coordinator, Emporia State University
LA

Lubie Alatriste

Professor, CUNY
CC

Chiu-Yin (Cathy) Wong

Monmouth University
DW

Dorothy Worden

University of Alabama


Saturday November 16, 2019 10:30 - 12:00
Arizona

10:30

Graduate writing: Preparing international students of diverse disciplines for writing demands in graduate school
Graduate writing for international students presents a host of challenges, and pathways programs that prepare international students must work with a diversity of proficiencies, language and academic backgrounds, and disciplines. This presentation details a practical and effective curriculum and teaching approach to graduate writing.

Speakers
KB

Karen Barto

Lecturer, CESL & WSIP, University of Arizona


Saturday November 16, 2019 10:30 - 12:00
Santa Cruz

10:30

Transforming politeness theory in writing studio consultations: A new methodological approach in mediating cross-cultural misunderstandings with international students
The purpose of this presentation is twofold: first, we recognize that international students come from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds and expect a hierarchical pedagogy structure; second, we suggest writing consultants adopt a refined model of politeness theory in conjunction with providing effective scaffolding strategies within a dynamic consultation process.

Speakers
JI

Jennifer Iceton

University of South Florida
ZL

Zhengjie Li

University of South Florida


Saturday November 16, 2019 10:30 - 12:00
Yavapai

10:30

Writing for publication purposes: Challenges of ESL/EFL writers
I am inviting instructors to discuss ways of assisting researchers in their writing for publication purposes. The presenter will share her experience of running a course for Russian early-career researchers offered by the Writing Center. The presentation will focus on ESL/EFL learners' challenges, course syllable, and learners' feedback on its effectiveness.

Speakers
SS

Svetlana Suchkova

Academic Writing Center director, Higher School of Economics


Saturday November 16, 2019 10:30 - 12:00
Pinal

11:00

An interplay between implicit theory of learning style and type of corrective feedback
The study compared the impact of the implicit theory of learning style, i.e. incremental or entity on learners' ability to benefit from WCF that doesn't match their learning style. The result showed that learners with incremental theory were more successful in gaining L2 accuracy than the entity learners.

Speakers
HJ

Hanan Jalali

Student, Shiraz University
MR

Mohammad Rahimi

Shiraz University


Saturday November 16, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Plata

11:00

Challenging dominant discourses in SLW courses: Students' changing perceptions of their English use
While World Englishes are closely connected to international students' identities, SLW courses in the US rarely address such variation. This study examined students' changing perceptions of their English language use before and after a 6-week unit on language variation and World Englishes.

Speakers
EP

Emily Palese

Graduate Assistant Teacher, English Department - University of Arizona
RL

Rachel LaMance

University of Arizona


Saturday November 16, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Chrysocolla

11:00

Rubrics as instruments of Assessment for Learning (AfL) in genre-informed ESL writing classrooms
This case study conducted at a writing program of a U.S. Southwestern university investigates to what extent the use of rubrics enables Assessment for Learning (AfL) in genre-informed first-year ESL writing classrooms. It has been found that use of analytic rubrics that reflect genre elements promote AfL principles.

Speakers
avatar for Mehtap Acar

Mehtap Acar

PhD Candidate, The University of Arizona
avatar for Serdar Acar

Serdar Acar

PhD Candidate, University of Arizona
My research interests center around genre pedagogy, genre-based writing assessment, multiliteracies for teaching writing, and assessment for learning in L2 writing classrooms.


Saturday November 16, 2019 11:00 - 11:30
Copper

11:30

Designing an analytic rubric for an online writing task
This paper analyzes student performance on an Internet-based academic writing task. Five raters sorted the blog posts of 120 EFL students into six groups according to merit. A subsequent factor analysis yielded the underlying constructs accounting for variation among groups, which led to an empirically-based rating scale for this genre.

Speakers
avatar for Kristin Rock

Kristin Rock

PhD Candidate, University of Hawaii at Manoa


Saturday November 16, 2019 11:30 - 12:00
Copper

11:30

Investigating the Efficacy of Written Corrective Feedback within the Expectancy-Value Theory
The study investigated the efficacy of Written Corrective Feedback (WCF) on the writing proficiency of 21 international, undergraduate students at the U.S. It also examined the role of motivation in the uptake of WCF. Findings revealed a main effect of WCF and positive correlations between increased writing proficiency and motivation.

Speakers
ME

Maad El-Gali

University of South Carolina


Saturday November 16, 2019 11:30 - 12:00
Plata

11:30

Student attitudes towards translanguaging in the L2 Spanish writing class
Based on the need to further understand the use of translanguaging in the classroom, the present article explores the translingual practices and attitudes of students in a Spanish undergraduate writing class by permitting flexible use of translanguaging through the creation of multimodal texts in a digital environment (Story Maps).

Speakers
avatar for Sergio Ruiz

Sergio Ruiz

Texas Tech University
Mr. Ruiz-Perez has taught Spanish for ten years in higher education. He is a professional translator and interpreter, and currently a Graduate Part-Time Instructor and second year PhD student of Spanish Linguistics in the Department of Classical & Modern Languages and Literatures... Read More →
avatar for Gema Lopez Hevia

Gema Lopez Hevia

Texas Tech University
DA

Dania Al-Barghuthi

Texas Tech University


Saturday November 16, 2019 11:30 - 12:00
Chrysocolla

12:00

Lunch Break (On Your Own)
Saturday November 16, 2019 12:00 - 13:30
Engrained, MU Food Court

12:15

13:30

Effects of computer-mediated collaborative writing on individual L2 writing
This study examines the influence of computer-mediated collaborative writing on L2 learners' individual writing, considering the impact of language proficiency and dyadic type. Our findings revealed that L2 learners were able to internalize certain skills and linguistics knowledge learned from collaborative writing into their individual writing performance.

Speakers
WJ

Wei Jiang

Lecturer, Case Western Reserve University
ZE

Zohreh Eslami

Texas A&M University at Qatar


Saturday November 16, 2019 13:30 - 14:00
Chrysocolla

13:30

Multilingual student-writers' perceptions of contract grading
The speaker presents findings from a mini-research on multilingual student-writers' perceptions of contract grading. Effectiveness of contract grading in first-year writing courses has been reported. This mini-research project aims to examine the effectiveness of contract grading on multilingual student-writers' writing development.

Speakers
EI

Erika I-Tremblay

University Writing Program, University of California, Davis


Saturday November 16, 2019 13:30 - 14:00
Copper

13:30

Socialisation into disciplinary citing practices in a year 1 health sciences course: Student and faculty perspectives
This presentation draws on questionnaire, interview and textual data to report on staff and student perspectives on fully embedded discipline-based support for source based writing. Although a successful collaboration between disciplinary and information services staff, ways in which explicit attention to specific academic literacy issues could be increased were identified.

Speakers
RW

Rosemary Wette

Senior Lecturer, University of Auckland


Saturday November 16, 2019 13:30 - 14:00
Yuma

13:30

Teacher feedback to promote critical thinking in EAP writing class: Case studies of polytechnic universities in Chinese context
This study enhances our deeper understanding of teachers' conceptualization of critical thinking strategies in EAP writing class at higher education. Findings may provide rich materials for teacher educators to run workshops for those teachers who feel difficult to guide students for thinking critically in writing for academic purpose.

Speakers
ZW

Zhenjing Wang

China University of Geosciences


Saturday November 16, 2019 13:30 - 14:00
Plata

13:30

CANCELLED: Explicit pronunciation instruction in an L2-writing course: Helping students to effectively communicate written ideas
In our workshop for university and IEP instructors, we will present a concrete method for integrating pronunciation instruction into an already-established writing curriculum. This method solidifies for students the relationship between critical thinking skills and effective communication; thus, it empowers students to effectively articulate their written ideas in university interactions.

Speakers
JC

Jennifer Campbell

University of Colorado at Boulder
SW

Summer Webb

University of Colorado at Boulder--IEC


Saturday November 16, 2019 13:30 - 15:00
Santa Cruz

13:30

Re-visioning lower division writing instruction
How does a small writing program at a large university respond to a sudden influx of multilingual students? Presenters in this colloquium will each offer an understanding of their role, challenges, and successes in a multi-year reform process, including conclusions that attendees can apply to their own campuses.

Speakers
KC

Kelly Crosby

Continuing Lecturer, UC Davis
avatar for Dana Ferris

Dana Ferris

Professor & Director, University of California, Davis
Dana R. Ferris, Professor and Director of the University Writing Program at the University of California, Davis, has had a wide-ranging career as a teacher, teacher-educator, researcher, writer, editor, and writing program administrator. Her books and articles have focused primarily... Read More →
TS

Tricia Serviss

Associate Director for Entry Level Writing, University of California, Davis
avatar for Dan Melzer

Dan Melzer

Director of First-Year Composition, University of California, Davis


Saturday November 16, 2019 13:30 - 15:00
Arizona

13:30

"Correcting" would be "cheating": Shifting attitudes toward grammar feedback in writing centers
"We don't do grammar in the Writing Center." This common reluctance stems from avoiding a proofreading service misconception and from tutors' fears that "correcting" writers' language might constitute cheating. Underlying these attitudes are beliefs about language: its acquisition, users and varieties. Explore a paradigm-shifting training model for equipping WC tutors.

Speakers
JT

Jenny Thomas

Pitzer College


Saturday November 16, 2019 13:30 - 15:00
Yavapai

13:30

Planning in L2 writing: A review of the research
Despite widespread research on L1 and L2 writing processes, little is known about the specific effects of one process—planning—on L2 writing performance. This workshop presentation traces the study of planning for writing studies from the 1980s to today, culminating in a discussion of teaching practices to aid L2 writers.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Johnson

Mark Johnson

Associate Professor, East Carolina University


Saturday November 16, 2019 13:30 - 15:00
Pinal

14:00

Digital multimodal writing in L2 contexts: A research synthesis
Digital multimodal writing has captured increasing attention in L2 contexts, due to the development of digital technologies. This presentation reports a research synthesis of eighteen representative empirical studies published in the recent decade. Main themes are examined; research trends are identified; pedagogical recommendations are discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Mimi Li

Mimi Li

Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University-Commerce
Dr. Mimi Li is an Assistant Professor of Applied Linguistics/TESOL in the Department of Literature and Languages at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Her research areas focus on L2 writing and CALL. Her work has appeared in Journal of Second Language Writing, Computer Assisted Language... Read More →


Saturday November 16, 2019 14:00 - 14:30
Chrysocolla

14:00

Effect of an EAP unit on EFL student effective and appropriate source-use skills
In this classroom-based study, we investigated whether a source-use oriented EAP unit can markedly improve student source-use skills. Results showed that the EAP unit led to significant improvement in three out of the four operations under source-use effectiveness and all three operations under source-use appropriateness.

Speakers
YD

Yao Du

University of Chinese Academy of Sciences


Saturday November 16, 2019 14:00 - 14:30
Yuma

14:00

Exam and non-exam academic writing settings: Processes and performances of EFL writers
Inspired by Shaw and Weir's (2007) socio-cognitive validation framework, this study is set to investigate evidence regarding the validity of high-stakes academic writing tests. For this aim, processes and performances of three graduate university students in 'exam' and 'non-exam' settings were studied using triangulation of eye-tracking, screen capture technology, and retrospective interview

Speakers
MH

Mojtaba Heydari

Allameh Tabatba'i University
FM

Fahimeh Marefat

Allameh Tabatba'i University


Saturday November 16, 2019 14:00 - 14:30
Copper

14:00

Examining L2 learners' affective engagement with WCF
This presentation reports on a case study that examined L2 learners' affective engagement with WCF. Details of the learners' beliefs that constructed their affective engagement will be discussed in the presentation while giving specific attention to how theories of emotion, attitude, and affect can be situated in the WCF research.

Speakers
RS

Ryuichi Sato

Arizona State University


Saturday November 16, 2019 14:00 - 14:30
Plata

14:30

Content development of postgraduate research proposals in a blended learning linked EAP course: Multilingual and multimodal content-based academic literacy co-construction
This study investigates the positive impact of content and language integrated scaffolding in a linked EAP course on postgraduate students' research proposal content development and writing.

Speakers
HL

Haiyan Lai

The University of Hong Kong


Saturday November 16, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
Chrysocolla

14:30

Source integration strategies across four levels: An analysis of university writing placement exam essays
This presentation will describe students' techniques for managing explicit intertextuality at 4 different levels. Elements analyzed include length and grammatical structure of direct quotes, integral versus non-integral citation, phraseology of integral citation, and selection of reporting verbs. The results reveal clearly differentiated patterns across the 4 placement levels.

Speakers
AL

Amy Lombardi

University of California, Davis


Saturday November 16, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
Copper

14:30

The burgeoning field of learner/student engagement with written (corrective) feedback: Insights and issues
Based on a review of recent journal articles exploring learner engagement with written feedback, the paper synthesizes the insights of these studies into the complexity of learner engagement in feedback contexts, highlights the major issues, such as homogeneity of research aims and methods, and suggests directions for future research.

Speakers
YH

Ye Han

Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen
YL

Yingying Li

Henan University of Economics and Law


Saturday November 16, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
Plata

14:30

Use of translation as a textual borrowing strategy in Chinese L2 academic writing
Adopting textual analysis and text-based semi-structured interviews, this study investigates the way L2 students cite research literatures written in Chinese through translation in writing an English academic article and these students' perception of the relationship between this behavior and plagiarism.

Speakers
BR

Beibei Ren

Graduate teaching assistant, University of South Florida


Saturday November 16, 2019 14:30 - 15:00
Yuma

15:00

Afternoon Refreshments
Saturday November 16, 2019 15:00 - 15:30
Alumni Lounge

15:30

Complexity judgment tests: Can they provide an additional way of understanding L2 written complexity?
This study argues that judgment tests may be applicable to complexity research and may provide an additional way of understanding L2 written complexity. It reports on the development of a complexity judgment test and the results from its implementation with 44 EFL learners along with insights gained from stimulated recalls.

Speakers
AS

Aysel Saricaoglu

Social Sciences University of Ankara


Saturday November 16, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Copper

15:30

Digital storytelling in the Spanish heritage language classroom: Learners' approach to multimodality
This study investigates how multimodality is approached by Spanish heritage language learners while creating a digital story. Results show that learners are aware of the multimodal nature of digital storytelling and that they orchestrate the semiotic resources accordingly in order to successfully convey their intended meaning.

Speakers
AP

Ana Padial

Texas Tech University


Saturday November 16, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Plata

15:30

Problem solving in collaborative writing tasks: Effects on peer interaction and L2 writing
The research involved 30 EFL learners performing three dictogloss tasks. Parts of the collaborative dialogue where learners expressed their uncertainty were analysed. The results reveal that uncertainty can be conducive to L2 learning by encouraging curiosity and exploration, but also be demotivating if learners repeatedly fail to address the problem.

Speakers
WC

Wenxue Chen

Southeast University


Saturday November 16, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Chrysocolla

15:30

Student and instructor perceptions on feedback to student writing
The study investigated EFL students' expectations of, preferences for and handling of teacher feedback and teachers' perceptions of written feedback and their expectations of students. The aim was to detect the areas of mismatch and find ways to satisfy both parties by informing them about these areas.

Speakers
GE

Gökçe Erkan

Middle East Technical University


Saturday November 16, 2019 15:30 - 16:00
Yuma

15:30

WCF 2.0: From old news to new horizons 14 1330-15
Five presenters advance the conversation on the future of written corrective feedback (WCF) research, partly in response to Atkinson and Tardy's 2018 JSLW article, "SLW at the crossroads: Finding a way in the field." Speakers will show how established WCF knowledge has opened the door to more holistic and genre-aware approaches.

Speakers
avatar for Dana Ferris

Dana Ferris

Professor & Director, University of California, Davis
Dana R. Ferris, Professor and Director of the University Writing Program at the University of California, Davis, has had a wide-ranging career as a teacher, teacher-educator, researcher, writer, editor, and writing program administrator. Her books and articles have focused primarily... Read More →
avatar for Icy Lee

Icy Lee

Professor at the Faculty of Education, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Icy Lee is a Professor at the Faculty of Education of The Chinese University of Hong Kong, where she is currently serving as Chair of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Her research interests include second language writing, classroom assessment and feedback, and second... Read More →
JR

Jennifer Ritter

Associate Professor, Westminster College
FX

Fang Xu

Professor, Nanjing University
CG

Christina Grant

University of Alberta


Saturday November 16, 2019 15:30 - 17:00
Arizona

15:30

Feedback Types and Peer Review Strategies
This presentation focuses on how to give positive and effective feedback on students' writing. Examples of formative feedback (evaluative and non-evaluative) and comments types will be provided and discussed as well as guidance for teaching step by step peer review strategies on different essay types.

Speakers
NM

Nadia Moraglio

Writing Specialist, University of Arizona
Nadia Moraglio is a writing specialist at WSIP and also teaches written composition and ESL at Pima Community College.


Saturday November 16, 2019 15:30 - 17:00
Pinal

15:30

Turning data into deliverables for L2 writers and writing tutors
Writing centers and writing programs routinely collect usage data but may be unsure how to apply it for programming purposes. Using case studies (or bring your own data!), attendees will interact with real data (e.g., usage spreadsheets, survey graphs, writers' reflections) to explore ways data can transform practice.

Speakers
VK

Vicki Kennell

Associate Director, Purdue University Writing Lab
MR

Molly Rentscher

Graduate Writing Support Coordinator, University of the Pacific


Saturday November 16, 2019 15:30 - 17:00
Yavapai

15:30

Using an equity lens to implement high-leverage K-12 writing instructional practices for culturally and linguistically diverse students
Grounded in the findings from a four-year Institute of Educational Sciences project, and currently applied through an Office of Elementary and Secondary Indian Education grant serving 10 San Diego County school districts, this workshop explores the high-leverage instructional practices in a K-12 second language writing approach widely implemented throughout California.

Speakers
avatar for Julie Goldman

Julie Goldman

Director, Equity Curriculum and Instruction, San Diego County Office of Education
Julie Goldman, Ed.D., is a coordinator at the San Diego County Office of Education. She facilitates professional learning around academic literacy for schools and districts throughout California. Throughout her career as a K-16 educator in the United States and internationally, Goldman... Read More →


Saturday November 16, 2019 15:30 - 17:00
Santa Cruz

16:00

CANCELLED: "Seeing in writing": A case study of a multilingual graduate teacher's academic socialization through multimodality
This ethnographically-oriented case study investigates the role of multimodality in fostering the academic socialization of a multilingual student-teacher. For the participant, linguistic diversity has a secondary role in her academic socialization in favor of multimodality, which offers a space for learning about the intellectual and emotional labor necessary to navigate academia.

Speakers
CS

Cristina Sanchez-Martin

Assistant Professor, Indiana University of Pennsylvania


Saturday November 16, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Plata

16:00

Language learning needs of basic writers and multilingual writers: Similarities and differences
This project aims to compare the similarities and differences of the language learning needs of different student groups traditionally considered as either basic writers or ESL writers, and to examine the extent to which these various learning needs have been addressed in current instructional materials. Implications for teaching are discussed.

Speakers
JL

Jinrong Li

Georgia Southern University
PL

Peggy Lindsey

The Ohio State University


Saturday November 16, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Copper

16:00

Softening teacher feedback through interactional affiliative practices and tools
By employing multimodal microanalysis of teacher-student interaction, this session demonstrates how teacher feedback can be softened through the use of affiliative interactional practices (e.g., empathy, compliment, playfulness) and tools (e.g., gesture, body movement, gaze, smile, intonation, facial expression).

Speakers
ES

Elena Shvidko

Utah State University


Saturday November 16, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Yuma

16:00

Teacher style effects on the effectiveness of e-feedback in ESL composition
Do different teachers use e-feedback differently? If so, is the effectiveness of e-feedback affected? This study of synchronous and asynchronous e-feedback provided by three teachers of ESL writing shows that teachers have different styles, but these do not affect the e-feedback's effectiveness. Rather, writer proficiency and course level do.

Speakers
avatar for Estela Ene

Estela Ene

Associate Professor, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis
Estela Ene is an Associate Professor, Director of the EAP Program and Director of the TESOL MA Program at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. She conducts classroom-oriented and corpus-based research on L2 writing in ESL and EFL contexts. She has written about pedagogical... Read More →


Saturday November 16, 2019 16:00 - 16:30
Chrysocolla

16:30

CANCELLED: Storyboarding, digital storytelling, and the writing process
This interactive session will present preliminary findings of research into the writing process for digital storytelling. We will highlight the role of storyboarding in the editing process. Compared to students who only created written narratives, students who created digital stories produced more robust writing and demonstrated more careful editing.

Speakers
AP

Abby Porter

New York University
MR

Mary Ritter

New York University


Saturday November 16, 2019 16:30 - 17:00
Plata

16:30

Exploring student voices: Digital literacies, social justice and cultural awareness in Spanish courses
This presentation addresses several case studies involving college students in a Spanish program on US and study-abroad campuses. We address the development of digital literacies through the exploration of issues of social justice, concern impacting global and local communities, and the fostering of cultural awareness in newly-adopted communities in Spain.

Speakers
IE

Idoia Elola

Professor of Spanish and Applied Linguistics, Texas Tech University
ME

Maya Edwards

Graduate Part Time Student Instructor, Texas Tech University


Saturday November 16, 2019 16:30 - 17:00
Yuma

16:30

Metapragmatic comments in web-based intercultural peer evaluation
Drawing on a socio-cognitive approach and data from an online exchange program involving Chinese and American university students, the study examines how revision-oriented metapragmatic comments are used to adjust the salience of contextual factors to construct a common ground between peer review participants in terms of knowledge and personal affiliation.

Speakers
XY

Xiaoye You

Professor of English and Asian Studies, Pennsylvania State University


Saturday November 16, 2019 16:30 - 17:00
Chrysocolla

16:30

The novice first author: Collaborative scholarly writing in an engineering research team
This ethnographically-oriented qualitative project investigates collaborative scholarly article writing in an engineering research team. Results show that the team operationalized their writing process with an apprenticeship model, in which a novice international graduate student was socialized into scholarly article writing with oral progress reports, and written feedback cycles.

Speakers
EB

Elif Burhan-Horasanlı

University of Arizona


Saturday November 16, 2019 16:30 - 17:00
Copper

17:15